This step gives the French press its name and reputation. Attach the plunger/filter assembly to the top of the carafe with the plunger fully extended. Using steady pressure (approximately 15 to 20 pounds of force), push the filter slowly to the bottom of the carafe. The spent coffee grounds should remain trapped behind the mesh filter, and the finished beverage should be dark and hot.
This retained bit of liquid does make for a slightly gloppier clean-up, though, unless further effort is applied to strain the grounds before scooping them out into a kitchen compost bin.  Another very slight hitch comes upon rinsing the cup-shaped interlocking components comprising the double filter system. There are a lot of tiny corners in the eight rectangular windows of mesh that make up each of the two filters, and because the micromesh is so effective, a residue of fines may cling stubbornly to the corners of the inner filter. It takes a bit of focus with a sponge to get every nook fully clean, and the plastic-and-mesh filter components feel fragile enough to suggest that extra care should be taken in this process. Espro sells replacement filters for $18.95, should a corner spring a leak.

Yet, all this tidiness comes at a rather high price. Shoppers could easily find another insulated steel press pot complete with a rubber filter gasket, then buy a decent (if not higher-precision) scale and a timer separately, and still come away with enough leftover cash for a couple of bags of fresh, locally roasted beans. Furthermore, users predisposed to this level of precision will probably already have a scale and timer on hand. But as an icebreaker for the clutter-averse newcomer to coffee geekery who’s more inclined to make the most of onboard features than to fiddle with multiple different devices in concert, the Precision Press is an excellent way to go.

BRU USA


This kind of experience can lead a user to avoid thoroughly cleaning the filter on a regular basis, which is particularly bad news given the mysterious grooves in the base plate. Furthermore, the glass is slightly hazy even at its cleanest, is not dishwasher safe, and there are so many warnings about its breakability (on the box, on the glass itself and in the instruction pamphlet) that one has to wonder just how many uses or cleanings it can withstand, even with the gentlest of handling.

OXO


A good French press has a plunger with a tight seal, meaning the plunger fits snugly inside the walls of the press to ensure that stray grounds don’t escape into your coffee. The plunger should also have a steel filter with a mesh screen to trap grounds at the bottom of the pot. The screen should be sturdy enough not to warp over time, but it’s still a huge plus if you can purchase replacement filters online.
If you always run out of time in the morning, you can make your coffee on the go with the Bodum Stainless-Steel Travel French Press Mug. Just spoon some coarsely ground coffee in the bottom, pour hot water on top, pop the lid on, and rush out the door. Plunge it down a few minutes later when you're in your car, on the subway, or at work, and voila! Fresh French Press coffee is yours.

Cresimo


To make it easy for you to soak all the information here, we’ve divided the guide into two parts. In the first part, we will introduce you to the leading products in this category through our reviews of French press coffee makers. And in the section that follows, we will discuss in detail all the factors you should consider when buying a French press coffee maker. By applying what you learn from these two sections, you will find the best product for your needs quickly and easily.
Our standard test included a one-minute preheat with freshly boiled water, and, to be charitable to the stoneware, we also tested it with a three-minute preheat to see if perhaps the stoneware simply needed longer to soak up the heat. The results were virtually the same, however, thus confirming that, as the stoneware does not contribute to improved brewing performance, its employment here is purely for aesthetic and branding reasons.

Utopia Kitchen


The Bottom Line: Quality comes at a price, and we would argue that a mild splurge on an Espro Press is well worth it. A niggling issue or two around cleaning the brewer keeps it from scoring even higher, though its heat-retention, its subtly elegant design and its nearly silt-free cup bring the Espro Press closer to perfection than any other press pot we tested.

Le Creuset


Yet, all this tidiness comes at a rather high price. Shoppers could easily find another insulated steel press pot complete with a rubber filter gasket, then buy a decent (if not higher-precision) scale and a timer separately, and still come away with enough leftover cash for a couple of bags of fresh, locally roasted beans. Furthermore, users predisposed to this level of precision will probably already have a scale and timer on hand. But as an icebreaker for the clutter-averse newcomer to coffee geekery who’s more inclined to make the most of onboard features than to fiddle with multiple different devices in concert, the Precision Press is an excellent way to go.
Material When you think of French press coffee makers, you might think of a glass carafe with a metal plunger — but as French-pressed coffee has become more popular, presses are being made from a wider variety of materials. Glass has the advantage of being clear so you can see the coffee, but it’s breakable. Metal is more durable but might not be as pleasing to the eye. Materials also affect the insulating ability of the carafe, and thus the length of time the coffee will stay hot.

Clever Chef


The insulated carafe retains heat very well, certainly well enough to maintain an optimum brewing temperature through the most important phases of brewing. In our tests, we pre-heated the carafe by filling it to the maximum fill line with water fresh off the boil and let it stand for one minute, then immediately refilled it with 600 grams of water at 205 degrees Fahrenheit. Within 30 seconds the brew-temperature refill of water dropped to about 197 degrees. But by the end of five minutes, it tended to drop only another 5 degrees, which indicates an admirable level of insulation — the second-best heat-retention performance among the French presses we’ve tested.
On the other hand, an argument could be made that, because the French press method is classic, and because glass is the classic material for the carafe, then a traditional cup prepared by this method ought to be brewed with a steeply declining temperature profile. Staunch traditionalists may therefore prefer the Chambord cup as it is, while contemporary perfectionists can always choose to spend more on a brewer with a better-insulated carafe to meet today’s more exacting standards for brewing consistency and control.

Caribou Coffee


The classic Bodum Chambord makes a balanced cup of coffee, retaining most of the tasting notes of the coffee and little of the grit of the grounds. Designed in the 1950s, the Chambord looks like the quintessential French press, and its steel frame is more durable than the Bodum Brazil’s plastic body. The Chambord didn’t make the brightest coffee of the bunch, but the flavors of its brew held their own against those of presses three times its price.

In addition to this, customers have complained about corrosion issues in the filter assembly. Yes, this model needs a few durability upgrades. But, such upgrades will increase the cost of the unit. So, all things considered, what you get right now is good for the money. However, if you’re looking for a French press that would last for years, this is not the product for you.

Coffee Anyone ???


Our testers loved this French press coffee maker for its beautiful aesthetic and expert design. “The plunger seal is the finest I've experienced, which is a big deal when you make French press coffee and don't want grounds to leak around the plunger as you pour,” one of our reviewers raved. While our testers didn’t find many flaws with this product, one mentioned that the (attractive) stainless steel design means you can’t watch the grounds steep in the water. “The lack of that visual is a little unsettling,” she explained, particularly if you are new to a French press. In general, though, the takeaway was simple: “It's a beautiful piece that feels worth the price,” declared one of our reviewers.

SterlingPro


Of course, that doesn’t mean it’s without faults. For example, you can’t measure how much water is in the press (holds 34oz). Not unless you pour water into a measuring jug first, and you can’t watch the coffee closely as you can in a glass press. Although the double-layered stainless steel does hold the heat well, it’s not a real vacuum thermos. But this is just nit-picking. Overall, we were very im-press-ed!
A final note on price: compared to its competitors, the Chambord came across as a real value, delivering top-notch styling and serious coffee at a very reasonable cost. But it is possible to get an almost identical Bodum model, the Brazil, for more than half the price. The only difference between the two presses is one of form, not function: instead of a chrome frame, the cage around the Brazil's carafe is plastic. Our preference is to eliminate household plastic wherever possible, but if budget is an issue for you, the Brazil is a great buy.
This kind of experience can lead a user to avoid thoroughly cleaning the filter on a regular basis, which is particularly bad news given the mysterious grooves in the base plate. Furthermore, the glass is slightly hazy even at its cleanest, is not dishwasher safe, and there are so many warnings about its breakability (on the box, on the glass itself and in the instruction pamphlet) that one has to wonder just how many uses or cleanings it can withstand, even with the gentlest of handling.
The Chambord's Achilles' heel is its glass body, which comes with two downsides. One: if you're even a teeny bit klutzy you will eventually break it. That said, it's easy to replace: a spare beaker can be ordered online for just $20. The second drawback: glass has very little insulating power, so if you want to drink your coffee hot, you better start sipping as soon as it's been plunged. Or, just do what I do and transfer the fresh brew to a thermos to keep it warm. (Doing so also reduces the chance that the coffee will get bitter from sitting too long on the grounds.) Ultimately, given how reliable and attractive the Bodum Chambord is, and how high-quality the coffee is that it produces, neither of these things feel like deal breakers.
The Bodum Chambord is our top pick for passionate coffee lovers. It looks superb, and it works even better. The materials are as good as they get in french presses. The many size options are particularly convenient for suiting your specific needs and wants. Be aware that even the best glass vessels are fragile, though. This one’s also a fair bit more expensive than the Brazil, and the difference is only aesthetic.

Stainless Steel French Presses: A double-walled design is key for stainless steel French Presses. Two walls will help keep the heat in and make for a better brew. You should also check for the quality of the stainless steel — 18/8 and 18/10 ratios of chromium to nickel are best. Stainless steel carafes are more durable, but you miss out on the fun visual element of glass French Presses.

Black Rifle Coffee Company

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