Just like the name suggests, this French press from Frieling features a double wall intended to keep the contents warm at a steady temperature for long periods of time. It also features a spacious carafe that doubles as an insulated serving pitcher, a feature that helps it retain heat four times longer than glass carafes. Furthermore, this press features a two-stage filter system with a pre-filter & super-fine mesh to minimize the risk of sediments. 

Mountain Thunder


For each brewer, we took into consideration its quality of material and build and its look and feel. We paid particularly close attention to the propensity of the filter to allow potentially flavor-dampening silt to pass into the cup. We concentrated on how easy or difficult the unit was to clean, including the disassembly and reassembly of its filter system.

GROSCHE


A final note on price: compared to its competitors, the Chambord came across as a real value, delivering top-notch styling and serious coffee at a very reasonable cost. But it is possible to get an almost identical Bodum model, the Brazil, for more than half the price. The only difference between the two presses is one of form, not function: instead of a chrome frame, the cage around the Brazil's carafe is plastic. Our preference is to eliminate household plastic wherever possible, but if budget is an issue for you, the Brazil is a great buy.

Coffee Bean Direct


The AeroPress is a very simple but effective method for getting a quick foamy cup of rich coffee on the go, and there is a formidable subculture of java heads that have ditched everything else altogether in light of it. It's also quick, especially because it requires espresso grounds, so there's not so much steeping time as there is with a French Press.
This proved to be true. Yet, while the Espro and the KitchenAid carafes are both constructed of insulated steel, it was surprising that the Espro performed better than the KitchenAid in our heat-retention test, probably owing to the Espro’s taller, narrower carafe design. Nevertheless, we were impressed not only by the KitchenAid’s digital add-ons that facilitate precise, weight-based brewing, but also by its robust and meticulous construction. However, the Espro’s double-filter design and optional paper filter, coupled with its elegant profile and similarly robust construction, pushed it to the highest rating among the five French press models we tested.

As a classically trained chef and an enthusiastic DIYer, I've always valued having the best tool for a job—whether the task at hand is dicing onions for mirepoix or hanging drywall. When I'm not writing about home products, I can be found putting them to the test, often with help from my two young children, in the 1860s townhouse I'm restoring in my free time.
Speaking of which, a French press should always be equipped with a reliable carafe, regardless of its comprising materials. Even though glass carafes are perhaps the most common, they tend not to have inbuilt handles and must be placed in a holder when used. With plastic carafes, you get roughly the same look as a glass carafe, with the added benefit of being much more durable overall. You then have ceramic carafes that have built-in handles and tend to keep the contents at a steady temperature for longer periods of time. Like we said, stainless steel carafes are without a doubt the most durable, albeit more susceptible to scratches.
Yet, all this tidiness comes at a rather high price. Shoppers could easily find another insulated steel press pot complete with a rubber filter gasket, then buy a decent (if not higher-precision) scale and a timer separately, and still come away with enough leftover cash for a couple of bags of fresh, locally roasted beans. Furthermore, users predisposed to this level of precision will probably already have a scale and timer on hand. But as an icebreaker for the clutter-averse newcomer to coffee geekery who’s more inclined to make the most of onboard features than to fiddle with multiple different devices in concert, the Precision Press is an excellent way to go.
Price - There is no considerable difference in the quality of the finished product produced by low-end and high-end models. However, price becomes a main consideration where durability, reliability, construction and ease of operation are concerned. In general, high-priced French Press coffee makers offer a more solid construction and better heat retention, while budget-priced models tend to focus on serving size variations and enhanced visibility during the coffee-brewing process.
One researcher we spoke to found those results alarming. According to Rob Martinus van Dam, an epidemiologist at the National University of Singapore, this rise in serum cholesterol is equivalent to a 6 percent increase in risk of coronary heart disease. “Given that heart disease is a complex disease with many contributing factors in the development of heart disease, this is a substantial impact for a single dietary habit,” van Dam said, adding that he would recommend regular French press drinkers who have high cholesterol or are at risk for heart disease switch to another, filtered method of coffee preparation that they enjoy.
On the other hand, an argument could be made that, because the French press method is classic, and because glass is the classic material for the carafe, then a traditional cup prepared by this method ought to be brewed with a steeply declining temperature profile. Staunch traditionalists may therefore prefer the Chambord cup as it is, while contemporary perfectionists can always choose to spend more on a brewer with a better-insulated carafe to meet today’s more exacting standards for brewing consistency and control.
Each Espro press also comes with 25 optional paper filters, which the company says can make your French press taste like pour-over. We brewed batches with and without the paper filters, and while the paper-filtered coffee tasted more refined, it still wasn’t as bright and clear as pour-over. If tasting pour-over is your ultimate goal, you’re better off just buying a pour-over setup, which would be cheaper than an Espro. Still, it’s a nice thought.
Metal French-press coffee makers are, in many ways, the most versatile. Like ceramic or stoneware coffee makers, metal French presses are also ideal for entertaining, handsome enough to put out as part of a fancy brunch spread. Though metal isn’t known for retaining heat, these are often well-insulated with double walls, meaning your fresh coffee will stay hot for a while. A lot of metal French presses are also dishwasher-safe, and the chances of breaking one are slim to none. The trade-off is that metal French presses are often quite expensive, so you’ll be paying if you want this kind of versatility.
Finally, I did a controlled study of the entire group. In each press, I made four servings of coffee using medium/coarse ground Ethiopian beans and 205°F water, letting it steep for four minutes before plunging. I used an instant-read digital thermometer to note the temperature of the coffee just after brewing, tasted through the full lineup and compared each brew's cleanliness, strength, and clarity of flavor, then recorded the temperature again after 30 minutes to measure how much heat each press had lost and whether the insulated models really performed as advertised.
Our standard test included a one-minute preheat with freshly boiled water, and, to be charitable to the stoneware, we also tested it with a three-minute preheat to see if perhaps the stoneware simply needed longer to soak up the heat. The results were virtually the same, however, thus confirming that, as the stoneware does not contribute to improved brewing performance, its employment here is purely for aesthetic and branding reasons.

Utopia Kitchen


I had another French Press but decided to upgrade to this one for a few reasons. I was looking for a smaller size since I only ever make coffee for myself in the mornings and don't need an 8-cup size and I also wanted a stainless steel filter and the ability to clean everything in the dishwasher. Things I noticed right away after receiving this item are first and foremost that this is a sturdy well-made press. The filters feel strong and the top part is pretty substantial in terms of size.

Our testers loved this French press coffee maker for its beautiful aesthetic and expert design. “The plunger seal is the finest I've experienced, which is a big deal when you make French press coffee and don't want grounds to leak around the plunger as you pour,” one of our reviewers raved. While our testers didn’t find many flaws with this product, one mentioned that the (attractive) stainless steel design means you can’t watch the grounds steep in the water. “The lack of that visual is a little unsettling,” she explained, particularly if you are new to a French press. In general, though, the takeaway was simple: “It's a beautiful piece that feels worth the price,” declared one of our reviewers.

SterlingPro


This kind of experience can lead a user to avoid thoroughly cleaning the filter on a regular basis, which is particularly bad news given the mysterious grooves in the base plate. Furthermore, the glass is slightly hazy even at its cleanest, is not dishwasher safe, and there are so many warnings about its breakability (on the box, on the glass itself and in the instruction pamphlet) that one has to wonder just how many uses or cleanings it can withstand, even with the gentlest of handling.
Le Creuset has made a name for itself over decades of producing high-quality kitchenware for cooking, baking and serving. This reputation for quality stems particularly from Le Creuset’s long lasting, brightly colored, enameled cast-iron and ceramic pots and pans. Le Creuset product lines are extensive, providing brand loyalists the opportunity to outfit entire kitchens with matching Le Creuset wares, down to mugs, trivets, food thermometers and over a dozen different Le Creuset-branded wine-openers. Le Creuset’s Stoneware French Press fits right into this line-up.
CONSThe mesh filter is not always effective at removing sediment from the coffee.The handle is not very well designed, which makes pouring a little awkward.Sediment is left floating near the bottom because the filter does not press all the way to the bottom.  CLICK TO CHECK PRICE 3. The KONA French PressLike the Colorful Brew, the KONA’s frame is made from BPA-free plastic. It features a stainless steel filter which does a better job at straining out the coffee grit than some of the more expensive presses, like the Bodum Chambord. Additionally, this bad boy is able to be completely disassembled and machine washed. The KONA French press comes in two sizes, a travel-friendly 12oz and a bigger 34oz version.However, what sets this French press coffee maker apart from the Colorful Brew is its unique design.The KONA is not only fun to look at, but also safer to use. The large handle is ergonomically designed so that the handle fits comfortably and more securely in your hand as you pour. Ergonomic handle design is often overlooked in a press pot, and shouldn't be glossed over ...we've burned our hands multiple times while pouring, so we know what we're talking about here!Apart from that, the KONA is the least expensive item on this list, and it still functions just as well as all the others, although it may not last quite as long.PROSLeast expensive coffee press on this list.A finer filter screen is better at straining out the sediment than the Bodum Chambord.Ergonomic design is easy and comfortable to handle.Plunger and mesh filter are both made out of stainless steel.Available in red or black.CONSCertain pieces, like the filter and filter attachments, have a comparatively short lifespan.The thin plastic lid on the KONA may begin to stretch and crack over time.  CLICK TO CHECK PRICE 4. The Frieling Stainless Steel French PressThe Frieling Stainless Steel French Press is one of the most stylish (and most expensive) press pots we've selected.Just like the Francois et Mimi, the Frieling is 100% stainless steel, but, unlike the Mimi, the Frieling holds 36 oz. instead of only 12 oz.It also features a double-walled interior, which makes it very effective at retaining heat.In addition to that, the Frieling’s two-stage filter fits more snugly into the chamber. With two extra-fine Italian mesh screens, it's excellent at keeping out sediment.All components of this French press coffee maker are machine washable, and the filter components don't even need to be disassembled for cleaning.PROSThe minimalistic design is both utilitarian and eye-catching.The two-stage metal filter is better at screening out sediment than other models.The stainless steel is more durable than glass.CONSThe most expensive on this list.It is not easy to clean.  CLICK TO CHECK PRICE 5. The Bodum Brazil French PressThe Bodum Brazil is rated as Amazon's #1 best seller, and the attractive price isn't the only reason. The carafe is borosilicate glass, but it's carried in a handle, base, and lid of BPA-free plastic, which serves as a combination shock absorber and design element. In addition to basic black, the plastic components are available in a brilliant apple-green and a cheerful red. Bodum's standard three-part filtration system is present here, with a stainless steel mesh held in place by a spiral plate on top and a cross plate below. These disassemble easily for cleaning and are dishwasher-safe, as is the borosilicate carafe.PROSSimple design plus eye-catching colors make this a standout on your kitchen counter.The metal filter comes apart for easy cleaning.Low price CONSPlastic isn't everybody's idea of elegance.Glass is inferior to stainless steel in heat retention (and more fragile).  CLICK TO CHECK PRICE 6. The Kuissential 8-Cup Stainless Steel French PressThe Kuissential looks an awful lot like the Sterling Pro French Press a few reviews below. It's made of stainless steel, it has double-wall construction for good insulation, and it has a similarly clean, cylindrical shape.The difference? The Kuissential has a single screen in the filter. Yes, just like every other French press we talk about (except the Sterling Pro).It's also noticeably less expensive than the Sterling. So if you like the look (and the double walls) and don't mind a little texture in your coffee, here's a way to get the look for a lower price. PROSCrisp, clean lines look great in any kitchen decor.Double-wall construction provides the best heat retention.Reasonably priced.CONSThe single screen allows a little grit to pass through.  CLICK TO CHECK PRICE 7. The Bodum Columbia French PressDistinct from the two Bodum coffee makers we've already reviewed, the Columbia has a charming rounded shape. The ergonomic handle reminds us of the handles on gooseneck kettles for pour over, which gives you more control when pouring the last of the coffee (important if you want to keep the worst of the sediment in the pot).Available in 17 oz., 34 oz., and 51 oz. sizes, the Columbia uses double-wall insulation to keep your coffee hot for a claimed two hours. PROSDesign echoes the classic teapot shape but with a modern twist.All components are dishwasher safe.Thermal insulation helps keep coffee hot.CONSMore expensive than many on this list.Some plastic components in construction.  CLICK TO CHECK PRICE 8. The Sterling Pro French PressThe stainless steel Sterling Pro will have you seeing double. First, its simple, clean design - a number of cylinders of different sizes assembled into a pitcher, a handle, and a knob for the plunger - has a huge number of imitators. Second, one of its key features, the SterlingPro Double Wall Construction, uses a double wall of stainless steel to provide maximum heat retention.But the last double is a fairly exclusive feature: its double screen filter. On the face of it, this simple, second mesh screen traps more sediment than a single. It's still not going to give you a completely grit-free cup like a pour over or drip coffee machine will, but the coffee is less chewy than what you get from the usual French press, yet still retains all the oils and solids that make French press coffee so flavorful.PROSDouble-wall construction provides the longest heat retention.The double screen filter makes a cleaner cup of coffee.Stainless steel is more durable than glass.CONSTwo filter screens mean more cleanup.  CLICK TO CHECK PRICE 9. The Coffee Gator French PressLike the idea of double-wall stainless construction but don't want a silver cylinder like everyone else? The Coffee Gator has the construction you need with the range of visual appeal you want. Choose from gray, green, pink, or brushed stainless to bring a pop of color to your morning cuppa. It's only available in 34 oz. capacity, but that's a good all-around size, especially if you share your morning coffee - for example, it's just shy of three 12-oz. cups or two 18-oz. travel mugs.And like the Sterling Pro, the Gator has a double filter to remove more sediment, without removing the oils that make the French press provide such delicious coffee.It even comes with an airtight mini container that holds enough coffee for two pots, if you plan on traveling. PROSStainless steel construction plus eye-catching color make this unique.Double screen filter produces a cleaner cup.Double wall construction provides superior heat retention.CONSCanister not recommended for dishwasher. Double screen filter requires a little more effort to clean.  CLICK TO CHECK PRICE THE VERDICTFor today’s review roundup, I have chosen the Frieling Stainless Steel French Press as the winner.Although it was a close race, the Frieling offered the highest quality (though admittedly at a price to match).The mirror-finished stainless steel construction makes the Frieling a thing of beauty, and the double-wall carafe keeps your coffee hot four times as long as a glass carafe. Dishwasher safe, 5-year warranty, and a two-stage filter round out the winning characteristics.If the price is a little steep, consider our runner-up: the Kona French Press. Good ergonomics and an effective and dishwasher-safe filter make this attractive pot a popular seller.Now that you know all about the best french press coffee makers on the market, it's time for you to learn how to expertly brew French Press coffee.If you still aren't sure whether you'd like French Press coffee - maybe you'd like a brewer with a bit less grit? We've compared all the different brewing methods for you here.TweetPin100Share+1100 Shares  Updated March 29, 2019 Categories ↓ Coffee Makers Gear  Related Posts AeroPress vs French Press [The Difference is Clear]  The 5 Best Milk Frothers For Coffee of 2019  Best Coffee Maker With Grinder 2019 (Grind and Brew)  2019 Breville Espresso Machine Reviews: The Top 7  The 5 Best Coffee Thermos’s of 2019  The 7 Best Coffee Storage Containers of 2019    ←Previous post  Next post→       Popular Posts The Last Coffee Grind Size Chart You’ll Ever Need How to Make Coffee Without a Coffee Maker [5 Hacks] How To Make Cold Brew Coffee In A Mason Jar 5 Best Siphon Coffee Makers (AKA Vacuum Coffee Brewers) 16 Bulletproof Coffee Recipes [Gets Your Mind + Body FIRING] What Type of Coffee Has the Most Caffeine?     About HomeGroundsWe are obsessed with great coffee - and since you've ended up here, we can only assume that you are too! 

If you are looking for a glass French press, then there are currently two models which lead in this segment – The KONA French press and the Bodum Chambord French Press. They are both classic coffee makers in their own regard but we decided to compare them on different metrics to help you pick the right one. So here is the comparison between the two heavyweights –
We originally wrote this post five months ago. Since then, we’ve heavily used the SterlingPro, and the biggest thing we’ve noticed is its durability. After multiple uses around the house, most other french presses have shattered, cracked, or chipped. Although this is due to user error, the stainless steel design of the SterlingPro completely eliminates this potential problem from the equation.

NAVA


Just like the name suggests, this French press from Frieling features a double wall intended to keep the contents warm at a steady temperature for long periods of time. It also features a spacious carafe that doubles as an insulated serving pitcher, a feature that helps it retain heat four times longer than glass carafes. Furthermore, this press features a two-stage filter system with a pre-filter & super-fine mesh to minimize the risk of sediments.

Mountain Thunder


The Bottom Line: Quality comes at a price, and we would argue that a mild splurge on an Espro Press is well worth it. A niggling issue or two around cleaning the brewer keeps it from scoring even higher, though its heat-retention, its subtly elegant design and its nearly silt-free cup bring the Espro Press closer to perfection than any other press pot we tested.

Le Creuset


We selected the top nine products and, over a highly caffeinated five-day stretch, performed four in-depth tests on taste, usability, heat retention, and amount of coffee grounds remaining after a pour. We also compared their key metrics: cost, capacity, cleaning ease, material, accessories, and portability. Our finalists are all made of high-quality material, like borosilicate glass and stainless steel.

KonaRed


For those who prefer darker roasts or who are switching to a French press directly from a low-performance automatic drip coffee machine, a low brewing temperature may not produce noticeably disappointing results. However, sub-optimum brew temperatures definitely will not bring out the best in dense-bean, high-grown, freshly light- or medium-roasted coffees. And some lower-priced French presses offer better insulation and heat retention, as well as a better-performing filter and a less wobbly lid.
In our tests, the Mr. Coffee carafe’s heat retention proved to be on par with that of the glass carafe of the well-respected and higher-priced Bodum Chambord. In fact, it performed slightly better in some respects. After the carafe was preheated for a minute with freshly boiled water, 600 grams of 205-degree-Fahrenheit fresh water added to the Mr. Coffee dropped, on average, to 199 degrees within the first 30 seconds, a better performance than the Chambord by about two degrees. By the end of five total minutes, the temperature descended another 16 degrees, a rate of decline that positions the Mr. Coffee squarely in the middle of the pack among the five presses we tested.

Bryan is our cooking and kitchen expert, with more than 15 years of experience of cooking and testing kitchen products. When outside of the kitchen, he enjoys woodworking, photography, videography and figuring out how to live a more eco-friendly lifestyle. He thoroughly enjoys discovering the best, whether it’s ingredients or equipment, and finding products that can stand the rigors of daily use.
If you are looking for a glass French press, then there are currently two models which lead in this segment – The KONA French press and the Bodum Chambord French Press. They are both classic coffee makers in their own regard but we decided to compare them on different metrics to help you pick the right one. So here is the comparison between the two heavyweights –
While a “cheaper” material like plastic may sound less elegant than glass or stainless steel, polycarbonate offers many of the same positive qualities as glass — but without the fragility or heat retention issues. Polycarbonate carafes are shatter-resistant and allow you to observe the brewing process. Many entry-level and mid-range French presses include polycarbonate carafes.
This kind of experience can lead a user to avoid thoroughly cleaning the filter on a regular basis, which is particularly bad news given the mysterious grooves in the base plate. Furthermore, the glass is slightly hazy even at its cleanest, is not dishwasher safe, and there are so many warnings about its breakability (on the box, on the glass itself and in the instruction pamphlet) that one has to wonder just how many uses or cleanings it can withstand, even with the gentlest of handling.

OXO


To make coffee using a French press, you’ll only need three things: ground coffee beans, hot water and your French press coffeemaker. Pour your ground coffee into your French press and shake them gently to make sure they’ve settled on the bottom. Then, add hot water to fill the press, stir and let the grounds steep. (You’ll want to be sure that the water you pour is heated between 198 and 204 degrees Fahrenheit. The right temperature is essential to extract essential oils and to develop the fullest flavor from the coffee beans.) After steeping, slowly press the plunger all the way down to filter the grounds from the coffee. Enjoy!

Chambord is a true original – the classic French press Coffee maker designed in the fifties. And we still produce it with the same painstaking craftsmanship we used way back when with the original. The frame and lid, made of steel, undergo several Chrome Plating processes to obtain a durable shiny surface that will last for many years of intense use. The only difference in the production process since the fifties is our commitment to the highest standards of environmentally correct manufacturing, which is especially important during the Chrome Plating process. The black CHAMBORD polypropylene handle comes in a matte finish that not only gives a comfortable grip while serving but adds to the classic quality of the design. The French press system has always been the simplest and ultimate way of brewing an excellent cup of Coffee. Using fresh coarse ground beans with water between 92 and 96 degrees Celsius brings out the very best in all types of Coffee.
 Bodum Insulated Stainless-Steel Travel French Press (Best French Press for Travel)– Stainless Steel construction ensures that it is able to handle the occasional drop and keeps your coffee warm even after two hours. Prevents the grounds from mixing with the brewed coffee post plunging. (Hence the coffee tastes the same from the first sip to the last)
Born and raised in Paris, the land of unapologetic butter, Francois has spent the last 20 years shaping the American culinary world behind the scenes. He was a buyer at Williams-Sonoma, built the Food Network online store, managed product assortments for Rachael Ray's site, started two meal delivery businesses and runs a successful baking blog. When he's not baking a cake or eating his way through Europe, Francois enjoys sharing cooking skills with cooks of all levels. Rules he lives by: "Use real butter" and "Nothing beats a sharp knife."
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One researcher we spoke to found those results alarming. According to Rob Martinus van Dam, an epidemiologist at the National University of Singapore, this rise in serum cholesterol is equivalent to a 6 percent increase in risk of coronary heart disease. “Given that heart disease is a complex disease with many contributing factors in the development of heart disease, this is a substantial impact for a single dietary habit,” van Dam said, adding that he would recommend regular French press drinkers who have high cholesterol or are at risk for heart disease switch to another, filtered method of coffee preparation that they enjoy.
Howard Bryman is a Portland, Oregon-based freelance journalist who focuses on the specialty coffee industry, which he has either worked in or written about for the past 10 years. He is the associate editor of Roast Magazine's Daily Coffee News website, and an occasional contributor to the print magazine as well. With experience as a barista, manager, roaster's apprentice, origin tourist and equipment tinkerer, Bryman's fascination with specialty coffee's tools, trends and challenges is matched only by his enthusiasm for the beverage itself.

BREWINGCOFFEE BEANSRegion GuidesCoffee ReviewsGEAREspresso machinesCoffee MakersAccessoriesGrindersRECIPES Home →Gear →The 9 Best French Press Coffee Makers of 2019 0 Best French Press Coffee Makers of 2019ContentsWhat To Look For In Your French PressMaterial - Stainless Steel vs GlassDesign & ComfortSize - Is Bigger Really Better?FilterThe Best French Presses of 20191.  The Francois et Mimi Double Walled French Press2. The Bodum Chambord French Press3. The KONA French Press4. The Frieling Stainless Steel French Press5. The Bodum Brazil French Press6. The Kuissential 8-Cup Stainless Steel French Press7. The Bodum Columbia French Press8. The Sterling Pro French Press9. The Coffee Gator French PressTHE VERDICTWalking up to just about any coffee shop, and ogling all the impressive and (sometimes) bizarre coffee gear (I'm talking about Mr. Syphon!), you could get the impression that brewing coffee is quite complicated.And you'd be wrong. Because nowhere in the Coffee Bible does it say that brewing can't also be simple. And perhaps the easiest of manual brewers is the French Press - a.k.a. the plunger, a.k.a. the 'press pot'. It's way, way easier than some drip coffee makers.Using the French Press is easy, and delicious: Grind freshly roasted, high-quality coffee beans in the right coarseness, put the ground coffee in the French press, pour hot water over it, and simply press down when your timer says 'Ding!' Done. So easy, even the French can do it. No precision pouring, stirring, or gooseneck kettles required. No paper filters needed. Many aficionados of coffee say the French press produces the best coffee. It certainly captures the full essence of the bean.Which is why, today - for all you devout caffeinistas - we’ll be taking a look at the most efficient, highest quality, and all-around best French press currently on the market.TOP PICK: Frieling Double Wall French PressThis press pot is beautiful and distinctive, but there's actually more to that! Its stainless-steel construction makes it long lasting and lets it keep your coffee hot 4 times as long as glass. Plus it has a double-screen filter of fine Italian mesh to reduce the grainy texture of some French press coffee. This is why it's our top pick. CLICK TO CHECK PRICE What To Look For In Your French PressDespite how simple the mechanism is, French Press coffee makers come in all sorts of variations, and it can be difficult to separate the functional from the flashy.To help you navigate the flurry of dinky knock-offs and overpriced frustration traps, here is a list of what to look for the perfect press:Material - Stainless Steel vs GlassThese coffee makers are almost exclusively made from one of two materials: borosilicate glass or stainless steel. Although some may think the choice between one or the other comes down to visual appeal, it’s really more of a practical matter.A glass carafe is pretty, but it won’t keep your coffee warm as well as a double-wall stainless steel French press.However, if you feel particularly driven towards glass, breathe easy, because unless you plan to let your coffee sit for more than ten minutes, the amount of heat lost in a glass coffee press isn’t too significant. If you pour it into an insulated travel mug the moment you push down the plunger, choosing a glass or stainless steel press makes no difference.Between these two choices, stainless steel offers you more control over temperature for a longer period of time, and this may be good for someone brewing for more than themselves.If you’re the one responsible for the morning coffee for you and your special someone, ensuring that their coffee will stay hot - no matter how long they take doing God knows what in the bathroom - can be the key to a happy morning.Also, stainless steel is orders of magnitude more accident-proof than a glass carafe (...yes, we're speaking from personal experience here).Although the glass often used in French presses - borosilicate glass - isn’t as fragile as momma’s fancy wine glasses, it’s still glass, which, as science still maintains, is more prone to breaking than steel.Design & ComfortDesign may seem superficial - and it often is - but it can also be practical. Comfort, for example, is one of those unappreciated-until-you-try-it advantages.Considering the times we crave coffee the most are also the times when our fine motor skills are at their lowest (AKA mornings), a comfortable handle may reduce the rate of morning rage-attacks.Whether you’re pouring for just yourself, or for a plus-one, a good handle keeps that delicate coffee maker from careening off the counter to an untimely, messy death.While on the topic of design, it’d be evasive to not at least mention aesthetics, so I’ll say this: a handsome French press isn’t always a well functioning one. Showing off your pretty new coffee brewer is fun and all, but delicious coffee doesn’t always come from the prettiest instruments (e.g. the AeroPress).Size - Is Bigger Really Better?When you make a cup of coffee, are you really just making a cup, or is it more like two cups? If your morning “cup” consists of one to wake and one to go, then you probably need something that can keep up.There are a few standard sizes to choose from, but 12 oz. and 34 oz. are the most popular. If you're alone or with someone else, I'd recommend going with the 12 oz. To give you some perspective, 12 oz. gives you one large cup of coffee, or two small cups. Needless to say, the 12 oz. model is also by far the more travel-friendly coffee press, for all you road brewers out there. If you often find yourself brewing for your family, colleagues or groups of friends, opt for the 34 oz. version. This would also be our recommendation if you're dealing with two coffee guzzlers, as you won't get two cups of coffee out of the 12oz. But bigger isn't always better. A French Press coffee maker is all about proportions. If you're going to use the 34oz., you'll need to put more coffee grounds and water in the carafe to make the ratio work with the depth of the plunger.FilterThe final consideration before purchasing your press is its filter. The filter in a typical French press, composed of a sandwich of steel mesh held in place by stamped steel, is not nearly as fine as those in a drip or pour over coffee maker, and therefore not as good at keeping out bits of sediment.However, a French press filter will not filter out the tasty and aromatic coffee oils as other filters will.Although some people like, or don’t mind, some extra grit floating around in their coffee, it’s not for everybody. That said, there are some unique ways to get around brew debris. One of these, the “pull” method of brewing, has you place coffee grounds on top of the filter, and pull them out after steeping.The Best French Presses of 2019Now that you know how to spot a good French press coffee maker, let’s take a look at the finalists:IMAGEPRODUCTFEATURESFrancois et Mimi Double Walled French PressGood for packing and travelingEffective at keeping your coffee hotter for longerCHECK PRICE →Bodum Chambord French PressMore reliable than other modelsGlass carafe in a stainless steel frameCHECK PRICE →KONA French PressLeast expensive on this listBetter at straining out the sedimentEasy and comfortable to handleDishwasher safeCHECK PRICE →Frieling Stainless Steel French PressUtilitarian and eye-catchingBetter at screening out sedimentMore durable than glassCHECK PRICE →Bodum Brazil French PressEye-catching colors make this a standout on your kitchen counterMetal filter comes apart for easy cleaningLow priceCHECK PRICE →Kuissential 8-Cup Stainless Steel French PressDouble-wall construction gives maximum heat retentionAll parts dishwasher-safe100% stainless steelCHECK PRICE →Bodum Columbia Stainless Steel French PressDesign echoes the classic teapot shape but with a modern twistAll compoments are dishwasher-safeThermal insulation helps keep coffee hot up to 2 hoursCHECK PRICE →Sterling Pro French PressSterlingPro double wall construction keeps coffee hotAvailable in 1.75L size (59 oz.), about six full-size cups100% stainless steel - no plastic partsCHECK PRICE →Coffee Gator French PressStainless steel construction plus eye-catching color makes this uniqueDouble screen filter produces a cleaner cupDouble wall construction provides superior heat retentionCHECK PRICE →1.  The Francois et Mimi Double Walled French PressAt only 12 oz., the Francois et Mimi French press is the smallest on the list, making it a smart choice for the solo brewer.Additionally, the interior of this coffee press has double walls and is made entirely from stainless steel, which makes it much better at retaining heat than the single-walled glass carafe that most other French presses have.Where this coffee maker loses some points is its relatively high price, and its comparatively less-effective mesh filter.For the small size (12 oz., 375 ml), you may not be willing to pay $40 for this French press, considering you can easily make the same amount of coffee in a lower priced, 34 oz. French press.In regards to the filter, although it is by no means bad, it is not as good as some of the others on this list.PROSThe small and compact design is good for packing and traveling.It is more effective at keeping your coffee hotter for longer.CONSThe small size can only accommodate 12 oz. at a time.It's the second most expensive on the list.The filter is not as effective at keeping sediment out of your coffee. CLICK TO CHECK PRICE 2. The Bodum Chambord French PressSomewhere amongst all the confusing press pot origin stories, the Dutch company, Bodum has also staked a claim. Although Bodum does not pretend to have invented the coffee press, they certainly contend to have perfected it.I won’t support or refute this claim, but I will say that it’s no mystery why Starbucks continues to stock their shelves with these very well designed coffee makers.Bodum has a number of different glass-walled French press coffee makers available (which you can see here), but this model is the classic. I have owned and used this press, and can attest to its reliability and ease of using and cleaning. The borosilicate glass used by Bodum has proven to be very durable and heat resistant. However, like the Francois et Mimi, the Bodum Chambord will leave a little fine sediment in your coffee, because the plunger doesn't press all the way to the bottom.
I’ve used (and broken) many French presses since my first year of college, and I still use one almost every day. For guidance, I spoke with Scott Carey, owner and roaster at Sump Coffee, a coffee shop in St. Louis. At Sump, Carey experiments with a variety of brewing methods. He even has a series of instructional videos on YouTube where he explains how each process works, along with the occasional moustache twirl. I also spoke to Matt Banbury, a regional salesperson at Counter Culture, who has used a slew of French presses at his work.
Capacity - A full-size French Press can typically produce a full cup of coffee. If you wish to make multiple cups at one brewing, choose a press with a more generous capacity and allows you to brew enough coffee for several drinkers. Since most French Press carafes don’t employ warming methods, it is important to consider the natural heat retention of the product you’re buying. A French Press with a large capacity won’t be of much value if it cannot keep the beverage hot for a reasonable amount of time.
A French Press is a classic coffee maker, and many manufacturers stick with a traditional design. Others add design flair that may or may not work in your kitchen. So think about whether you want to look at a particular model day in and day out. While most can be stowed away easily, you'll likely want to keep it handy once you've mastered the technique.
The Brazil’s lid has a less-than-snug fit on the top of the beaker and can wiggle if you jostle it, but it still traps heat in the pot long enough for you to brew and pour. Freeing the beaker from its snug-fitting plastic shell to clean in between the two is also more difficult, requiring more wiggling than the Chambord’s shell. But you won’t need to clean the inside of the plastic too often.
While a “cheaper” material like plastic may sound less elegant than glass or stainless steel, polycarbonate offers many of the same positive qualities as glass — but without the fragility or heat retention issues. Polycarbonate carafes are shatter-resistant and allow you to observe the brewing process. Many entry-level and mid-range French presses include polycarbonate carafes.
Stainless Steel French Presses: A double-walled design is key for stainless steel French Presses. Two walls will help keep the heat in and make for a better brew. You should also check for the quality of the stainless steel — 18/8 and 18/10 ratios of chromium to nickel are best. Stainless steel carafes are more durable, but you miss out on the fun visual element of glass French Presses.
As a classically trained chef and an enthusiastic DIYer, I've always valued having the best tool for a job—whether the task at hand is dicing onions for mirepoix or hanging drywall. When I'm not writing about home products, I can be found putting them to the test, often with help from my two young children, in the 1860s townhouse I'm restoring in my free time.

Espro’s marque innovation, the patent-pending micromesh double filter, works exceptionally well on its own, reducing the amount of silt in the cup to a wisp, unlikely to provoke a complaint even from a pour-over paper-filter devotee. Additionally, the Espro offers the option of sandwiching a custom paper filter between its dual layers of micro-mesh, thus combining the appeal of both pour-over and French press, and potentially netting a cup with the richly blended flavor and sweetness associated with full-immersion brewing, yet with the lighter mouthfeel and more delicate, articulated aromatics associated with filter-drip brewing.
Unfortunately, polycarbonate is prone to scratches and dings over time. Cleaning can pose a challenge, and interior staining can occur. There is also the concern that a chemical called BPA could leach out of the plastic and into the food. We urge consumers to look for phrases like “BPA-Free” or “Contains No BPA” when considering a polycarbonate model.
Deciding whether or not this French press truly earns its place in a kitchen equipped with the company’s skillets or Dutch ovens depends, to some extent, on what one’s goals are in owning such a piece. If beauty is the most important thing, either independently or to reinforce a look, then there may be no substitute for a genuine Le Creuset French press. Yet if a dedicated home chef invests in quality Le Creuset cookware less for the look and more for the pleasure of using well-made tools, then this French press may not live up to expectation.
Plunger and handle design: The plunger keeps the grounds out of your cup of Joe, and the handle helps you keep the carafe steady as you push the plunger down. It's also key for pouring coffee into your cup. Most plungers have multiple metal screens to keep the grounds out of your coffee, including a large steel screen and a finer mesh screen to catch tinier particles. Some use a basket design, but most don't. The handle should be sturdy, strong, heat resistant, and not prone to breakage.
In addition to this, customers have complained about corrosion issues in the filter assembly. Yes, this model needs a few durability upgrades. But, such upgrades will increase the cost of the unit. So, all things considered, what you get right now is good for the money. However, if you’re looking for a French press that would last for years, this is not the product for you.

We spent two weeks brewing and plunging and sipping our way through a slew of well-regarded presses in an array of materials, shapes, and sizes. The goal: to find the best French press—one that produces a superior brew and can withstand intensive everyday use. Keep reading to see how the results shook out; for the specifics of how we tested and other models we considered, scroll to the bottom of the page.


This is the same type of glass used to create bakeware that can withstand oven temperatures of 450 degrees or higher. Unlike regular glass, borosilicate consists at least 5% of a compound called boric oxide. When putting together with silica and boron trioxide, this glass becomes extremely resistant to thermal shock. In non-science and geeky words: your carafe will not explode into hundreds of tiny pieces when you pour hot water inside. It will, however, break should you drop it on a hard surface.

Reviews of the Bodum Chambord on Amazon are largely positive (about 3,000, rounding out to 4.2/5 stars), but a good number of them complain about the same thing: The stainless steel frame that holds the carafe in place is wont to warp over time, especially if you're not careful when you remove the carafe. That would be more or less fine if the plastic handle weren't supported by it on one side with no fastener.


The Planetary Design Table Top French Press remains our favorite coffee maker for camping. It brews cleanly and offers better insulation than any other press we tested. But while it travels well to a campsite, it looks unwieldy on a kitchen counter. If you plunge too fast, you’ll end up with splattered droplets of hot coffee on your breakfast. It’s also harder to clean, with a small metal cap that detaches from the end of the filtering pole and can slide into the drain if you’re not careful.
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Deciding whether or not this French press truly earns its place in a kitchen equipped with the company’s skillets or Dutch ovens depends, to some extent, on what one’s goals are in owning such a piece. If beauty is the most important thing, either independently or to reinforce a look, then there may be no substitute for a genuine Le Creuset French press. Yet if a dedicated home chef invests in quality Le Creuset cookware less for the look and more for the pleasure of using well-made tools, then this French press may not live up to expectation.
Of course, that doesn’t mean it’s without faults. For example, you can’t measure how much water is in the press (holds 34oz). Not unless you pour water into a measuring jug first, and you can’t watch the coffee closely as you can in a glass press. Although the double-layered stainless steel does hold the heat well, it’s not a real vacuum thermos. But this is just nit-picking. Overall, we were very im-press-ed!
The Espro Press entered the market about five years ago with the distinction of having been the focus of one of the earliest successful coffee-related Kickstarter campaigns. When the crowd-funding platform itself was less than three years old, the Espro project raised over 550 percent of its $15,000 goal, then actually shipped its promised product to backers only three months later. So, not only did the company pitch, design and manufacture a superlative product, but its fundraising efforts and follow-through were also exemplary.

Frieling

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