Coffee presses, also commonly called “French presses” are one of the oldest and simplest forms of coffee-making equipment. Portable, virtually waste free, and easy to use, it’s clear why many prefer press brewing. Here at Seattle Coffee Gear, we proudly carry a wide selection of coffee presses in varying sizes and design styles to suit living spaces of all kinds. Read on to learn more about the joyous simplicity of French press coffee brewing, and order your high-quality coffee press today!
Making French press coffee isn’t rocket science, but it is a culinary art that can be helped greatly by a little diligence and a well-made coffee press. At Seattle Coffee Gear, we’ve stocked our inventory with high-quality coffee presses from some of the industry’s top brands to help you make the best cup of French press coffee possible. We also offer a host of tips and tricks to help you improve your coffee craft, as well as customer support to answer any questions you might have. Browse our selection of French press coffeemakers and order with us today!
The filter itself is Stainless steel and disassembles into just three parts: the spiral plate, mesh, and bottom cross plate. While there is only one filter, it is a fine mesh and does a good job of keeping your coffee clean. (Not as clean as some of the newer micro-filters or dual-screens.) This simple design does make it easy to clean and maintain though.
With a price that would seem steep on even the best electric brewer, the Frieling topped our test of French-press models in large part because of its insulated, stainless steel design. That helped it keep coffee hot and hands cool, and its double-layer mesh strainer had the smallest openings of any model reviewed, helping it keep grounds from slipping through into brewed coffee. But unlike glass models, you can’t see how much coffee is left in the carafe.
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Yet, all this tidiness comes at a rather high price. Shoppers could easily find another insulated steel press pot complete with a rubber filter gasket, then buy a decent (if not higher-precision) scale and a timer separately, and still come away with enough leftover cash for a couple of bags of fresh, locally roasted beans. Furthermore, users predisposed to this level of precision will probably already have a scale and timer on hand. But as an icebreaker for the clutter-averse newcomer to coffee geekery who’s more inclined to make the most of onboard features than to fiddle with multiple different devices in concert, the Precision Press is an excellent way to go.
This kind of experience can lead a user to avoid thoroughly cleaning the filter on a regular basis, which is particularly bad news given the mysterious grooves in the base plate. Furthermore, the glass is slightly hazy even at its cleanest, is not dishwasher safe, and there are so many warnings about its breakability (on the box, on the glass itself and in the instruction pamphlet) that one has to wonder just how many uses or cleanings it can withstand, even with the gentlest of handling.

This is by far the most reasonably priced French press on the market that consistently delivers great coffee. It is easy to maintain, it is made of much thicker borolisicate glass when compared to other brands, and it has a good filtration system. This is Coffee Dork’s recommended top choice, but you are welcome to keep reading and see all other presses that we have reviewed below!

For each brewer, we took into consideration its quality of material and build and its look and feel. We paid particularly close attention to the propensity of the filter to allow potentially flavor-dampening silt to pass into the cup. We concentrated on how easy or difficult the unit was to clean, including the disassembly and reassembly of its filter system.

GROSCHE


And, given the critical importance of maintaining proper water temperature for brewing coffee, we conducted a series of tests on each brewer to measure heat-retention capabilities. These tests focused on measuring the rate at which hot water cooled over time inside the carafe, both with and without pre-heating, and at various volumes. We put particular weight on one test that we thought best exemplified a real-life situation, which involved pre-heating the pitcher by filling it to its maximum fill line with freshly boiled water and letting it stand for one minute, then dumping and refilling with 600 grams of water at a typical starting brewing temperature of 205 degrees Fahrenheit.

Primula


Scott Carey of Sump Coffee told us he recommended a French press for anyone who loved dark-roast coffee. While lighter roasts shine in their clarified fruity tasting notes, dark roasts have less palate complexity and are perfect candidates for a French press, according to Carey. “When you muddle the cup and add body, you get that great mouthfeel and you can get a little more sweetness,” he said, adding that it produced a brew that had “more bass than treble.”
The two stainless steel French presses, made by Frieling and SterlingPro, are both designed with two layered walls of 18/10 stainless steel for insulation. Steel has two distinct advantages over glass: it keeps liquids hotter for longer and it is nearly impossible to break. There’s also no need for a protective frame. This is a major reason why insulated French presses made from stainless steel are so popular among professionals and aficionados.
A final note on price: compared to its competitors, the Chambord came across as a real value, delivering top-notch styling and serious coffee at a very reasonable cost. But it is possible to get an almost identical Bodum model, the Brazil, for more than half the price. The only difference between the two presses is one of form, not function: instead of a chrome frame, the cage around the Brazil's carafe is plastic. Our preference is to eliminate household plastic wherever possible, but if budget is an issue for you, the Brazil is a great buy.

Coffee Bean Direct


We tested six glass French presses and two stainless steel French presses. All of the glass carafes are constructed with borosilicate. The addition of boric acid to the glass mixture increases its resilience to heat and sudden temperature change. It is the standard not just for coffee presses but for all glass cookware and scientific laboratory equipment as well.


When it comes to insulation, materials and techniques must be kept in mind. Some insulating materials are better or longer lasting than others. It also might happen that some models might gradually lose insulation because of some kind of problem or just from age. If it’s well over the warranty date, then you might go for a new model. However, it’s better to stick to a reputable company so that you can get a replacement if it’s within the warranty date.
The Espro Press entered the market about five years ago with the distinction of having been the focus of one of the earliest successful coffee-related Kickstarter campaigns. When the crowd-funding platform itself was less than three years old, the Espro project raised over 550 percent of its $15,000 goal, then actually shipped its promised product to backers only three months later. So, not only did the company pitch, design and manufacture a superlative product, but its fundraising efforts and follow-through were also exemplary.

VonShef


After studying a wide range of reviews, articles, and Amazon user comments, we settled on seven French presses to test across three categories: glass carafe, insulated stainless steel, and insulated plastic. In the glass category, the Espro P3, which has garnered lots of praise from critics and Amazon users, was the tightest competitor with our top pick, the Bodum Chambord, and after using it a few times, its charms were clear. The unique bucket-shaped filtering system did the most thorough job of separating the grinds from the brew of any of the presses we tested, yielding coffee that was bright and clean tasting, with barely a trace of sediment in the cup. The Espro's glass carafe was also slightly better at retaining heat than the Chambord's, keeping the coffee seven degrees warmer inside the pot after 30 minutes. But compared to the Chambord's chrome frame, the Espro's plastic frame and handle felt a bit chintzy and fell short on style points. Most importantly, the 32-ounce Espro P3 costs around $70, almost twice the price of the 34-ounce Chambord. Ultimately, while we were impressed by the Espro's performance, we didn't think the difference was dramatic enough to justify the disparity in price.

Entering the high-end of the French presses spectrum, we find the Presse by Bobble, an ingenious coffee maker designed to impress. It not only features a quality micro-filter that separates grounds from brewed coffee but also features a 3-wall insulation to keep the coffee hot for hours after you’ve made it. Not only that but it also involves no plastic pod or paper filter waster to make its entire operation so much easier.


If you’re willing to pay more for a press that preserves as much of your beans’ brightness and flavor as possible, we recommend the Espro Press P3. The clear front-runner among our tasting panel, this Espro model offers an unusual bucket-shaped double filter that’s much finer than most and will keep your coffee almost as grit-free as pour-over. But at around twice the price of the Chambord at this writing, the Espro P3 is a definite splurge, so we recommend it only for people who are very particular about grit in their coffee.
While buying a French Press there are not many things you need to consider. You basically need to pinpoint at one basic purpose of your French Press. If you need something durable and prefer a stronger cup of coffee, then getting a stainless steel French press is recommended but for aficionados, nothing beats the experience of brewing coffee on a glass French press.
This is by far the most reasonably priced French press on the market that consistently delivers great coffee. It is easy to maintain, it is made of much thicker borolisicate glass when compared to other brands, and it has a good filtration system. This is Coffee Dork’s recommended top choice, but you are welcome to keep reading and see all other presses that we have reviewed below!
This step gives the French press its name and reputation. Attach the plunger/filter assembly to the top of the carafe with the plunger fully extended. Using steady pressure (approximately 15 to 20 pounds of force), push the filter slowly to the bottom of the carafe. The spent coffee grounds should remain trapped behind the mesh filter, and the finished beverage should be dark and hot.

Well, yes, one gets what one pays for. I paid only 10 dollars for my unit. Does anyone really need to drop more than a sawbuck on a French press to make a basically drinkable cup? For patient cleaners and those who don’t mind a murky cup, perhaps not. But for anyone else, given there are so many other options available at an only slightly higher price, it will pay to shop around.

Bodum’s Chambord is our ultimate recommendation for a french press. This is the company’s original design, and it’s what most people imagine when they hear the words “french press.” It looks fantastic, it’s very user-friendly, and it comes in lots of different sizes. There’s a perfect Chambord for any household size, whether you’re a solo coffee drinker or brewing for a family. All the options are made entirely in Portugal.


The Bodum Chambord produced a clear-flavored and consistent cup of coffee that our tasters liked just as much as coffee brewed in most of the other presses we tested, most of which cost more. Its simple glass beaker, steel filtering screens, and elegant steel frame appear refined rather than cheap, and its filter pushes down with more ease than other presses’ halting, skittish plungers.

When it comes to high-end French presses, Secura’s Stainless Steel French Press Coffee Maker stands out as one of the absolute best. We say this because it features a 3-layered stainless steel filter structure that traps even the smallest coffee grounds to produce an exceptional full-bodied flavor. Not only that but it also comes with a stainless steel screen that is extremely easy to disassemble and clean when needed. When stacking one or more screens together, you get the capacity to refine your espresso even further, thus giving it that extra bit of flavor many people look for.

Clean up is a breeze. I add just a bit of water to the carafe after I remove it from the frame and pour into a strainer over the sink. Rinse with water and then dispose of the grounds in the garbage. Then wash by hand, remove and wash plunger ( screen, coil press, etc), dry all pieces except screen and put back together. Takes about 3 minutes or so. Ready for next use. And looks so pretty on the counter and while brewing.

COLD BREW LAB


One of the top models, if not THE top model when it comes to insulated French presses is the Espro Press Stainless Steel vacuum insulated French press. As you can easily see from its name, this machine has a vacuum insulation. Double wall is good, but making a vacuum in the middle is great, because it’s hard for heat to travel through empty space! This gives it one of the best levels of insulation that you can achieve.
If you’re willing to pay more for a press that preserves as much of your beans’ brightness and flavor as possible, we recommend the Espro Press P3. The clear front-runner among our tasting panel, this Espro model offers an unusual bucket-shaped double filter that’s much finer than most and will keep your coffee almost as grit-free as pour-over. But at around twice the price of the Chambord at this writing, the Espro P3 is a definite splurge, so we recommend it only for people who are very particular about grit in their coffee.
We settled on 600 grams of water because that not only represented a weight/volume that all our test products could contain, but also because it represents just a bit more than one would need to brew two 10-ounce mugs of coffee, which is among the more common serving volumes needed in a household brewer. We wanted to test the same weight/volume in each device, given that different presses have varying maximum capacities and their rate of heat loss when filled to the maximum will differ.

French Presses


Bodum’s Chambord is our ultimate recommendation for a french press. This is the company’s original design, and it’s what most people imagine when they hear the words “french press.” It looks fantastic, it’s very user-friendly, and it comes in lots of different sizes. There’s a perfect Chambord for any household size, whether you’re a solo coffee drinker or brewing for a family. All the options are made entirely in Portugal.
This is by far the most reasonably priced French press on the market that consistently delivers great coffee. It is easy to maintain, it is made of much thicker borolisicate glass when compared to other brands, and it has a good filtration system. This is Coffee Dork’s recommended top choice, but you are welcome to keep reading and see all other presses that we have reviewed below!
After putting in over 16 hours of research and testing, speaking with several baristas, testing six top contenders in a blind-tasting panel, and making more than 40 cups of coffee, we think the Bodum Chambord is the best French press for most casual coffee drinkers. In our tests, the elegant-looking press brewed coffee that was as grit-free as brews from models that cost up to three times as much. The Chambord is easy to clean and use, and we found that it made balanced, rich coffee with little muddiness.

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Here’s a little secret about French-press coffee makers: They all basically work the same. You add the coffee grounds, you pour in hot water from your kettle, you stir, you cover and wait about four minutes, you plunge, and then you pour into a mug and enjoy. And unlike drip coffee makers, which will only make coffee as good as the machine, the quality of coffee you get from a French press relies pretty heavily on your skill and process, as well as the quality of beans that you’re using. That’s why it can be hard to tell if coffee was made in a French press that costs $10 or $100, just by sipping it.
Most glass French presses are made of borosilicate, a type of glass made more resistant to thermal shock by the addition of boric oxide. Thermal shock is what causes glass to break when it undergoes sharp changes in temperature. So a borosilicate beaker is important if you want your French press to remain in one piece even when you fill it with boiling water.
The press is made from 18/10 stainless steel with double-wall construction that retains heat better than single-wall metal or glass carafes, so it’s great as a serving carafe at the table, while the interior is brushed stainless steel. The press disassembles easily and is dishwasher safe, but you don’t need to disassemble the plunger before washing.
Here’s what we do know. Coffee made without a paper filter does contain substances called cafestol and kahweol. These molecules can decrease LDL receptors, which are responsible for siphoning LDL cholesterol out of your body’s circulation. “This decreased number of LDL receptors would be expected to raise your cholesterol,” said Dr. Karol Watson, a cardiologist and co-director of the UCLA Program in Preventive Cardiology.
Price - There is no considerable difference in the quality of the finished product produced by low-end and high-end models. However, price becomes a main consideration where durability, reliability, construction and ease of operation are concerned. In general, high-priced French Press coffee makers offer a more solid construction and better heat retention, while budget-priced models tend to focus on serving size variations and enhanced visibility during the coffee-brewing process.

The body of the P7 has insulating vacuum-sealed double walls that will keep your coffee hot longer than a glass press could. After brewing coffee in this Espro model and leaving it alone for two hours, we returned to find pretty warm coffee. As in the P3, in the P7 the signature bucket-shaped filter slows extraction as soon as you plunge. We still recommend pouring your freshly brewed coffee into a separate carafe to stop the beans from extracting further and making your coffee bitter, but if you do happen to leave your plunged coffee in the P7 a little longer than intended, it won’t be a complete disaster.
As a result, the handle tends to slip out of the frame once it's been bent, and that's how catastrophe takes place. I've noticed this myself and had one or two close calls over the years, but I was able to bend it back into place which, touch wood, has held. Still, it's certainly an inconvenience. What's more inconvenient is a limited one year warranty that doesn't cover the glass.

Here’s what we do know. Coffee made without a paper filter does contain substances called cafestol and kahweol. These molecules can decrease LDL receptors, which are responsible for siphoning LDL cholesterol out of your body’s circulation. “This decreased number of LDL receptors would be expected to raise your cholesterol,” said Dr. Karol Watson, a cardiologist and co-director of the UCLA Program in Preventive Cardiology.
Stainless Steel French Presses: A double-walled design is key for stainless steel French Presses. Two walls will help keep the heat in and make for a better brew. You should also check for the quality of the stainless steel — 18/8 and 18/10 ratios of chromium to nickel are best. Stainless steel carafes are more durable, but you miss out on the fun visual element of glass French Presses.

Black Rifle Coffee Company

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