For each brewer, we took into consideration its quality of material and build and its look and feel. We paid particularly close attention to the propensity of the filter to allow potentially flavor-dampening silt to pass into the cup. We concentrated on how easy or difficult the unit was to clean, including the disassembly and reassembly of its filter system.
On the other hand, an argument could be made that, because the French press method is classic, and because glass is the classic material for the carafe, then a traditional cup prepared by this method ought to be brewed with a steeply declining temperature profile. Staunch traditionalists may therefore prefer the Chambord cup as it is, while contemporary perfectionists can always choose to spend more on a brewer with a better-insulated carafe to meet today’s more exacting standards for brewing consistency and control.

Caribou Coffee


The plunger has a layered construction. On the bottom is a spiral plate with a coil around the sides-it keeps the filter mesh firmly in place, and helps account for slight differences in glass manufacturing. In between is the mesh filter, to keep the grounds at the bottom of the beaker. On top is a simple cross plate which holds the mesh onto the spiral plate.


For this survey of French presses, we selected a representative cross-section of widely available units from this popular brewer category. We tested one example for each of five key sub-categories: a classic model (Bodum Chambord), a budget-friendly option (Mr. Coffee Coffee Press), a high-tech addition to the market (KitchenAid Precision Press), a technically refined premium press (Espro Press), and a press for which aesthetics and brand identity are chief appeals (Le Creuset French Press).

Our standard test included a one-minute preheat with freshly boiled water, and, to be charitable to the stoneware, we also tested it with a three-minute preheat to see if perhaps the stoneware simply needed longer to soak up the heat. The results were virtually the same, however, thus confirming that, as the stoneware does not contribute to improved brewing performance, its employment here is purely for aesthetic and branding reasons.

Utopia Kitchen


Price - There is no considerable difference in the quality of the finished product produced by low-end and high-end models. However, price becomes a main consideration where durability, reliability, construction and ease of operation are concerned. In general, high-priced French Press coffee makers offer a more solid construction and better heat retention, while budget-priced models tend to focus on serving size variations and enhanced visibility during the coffee-brewing process.
Though virtually all of the French presses and pour-over coffee makers that Consumer Reports tested make a good cup of coffee, they varied in their ease of use, with the best of the bunch keeping hands safely away from hot surfaces and proving easy to clean. Top-performing French presses varied in the quality of their permanent mesh filters, which is the only line of defense against grounds that can otherwise end up in your cup. Below, a selection of top manual coffee makers from our most recent tests.
Making French press coffee isn’t rocket science, but it is a culinary art that can be helped greatly by a little diligence and a well-made coffee press. At Seattle Coffee Gear, we’ve stocked our inventory with high-quality coffee presses from some of the industry’s top brands to help you make the best cup of French press coffee possible. We also offer a host of tips and tricks to help you improve your coffee craft, as well as customer support to answer any questions you might have. Browse our selection of French press coffeemakers and order with us today!
For each brewer, we took into consideration its quality of material and build and its look and feel. We paid particularly close attention to the propensity of the filter to allow potentially flavor-dampening silt to pass into the cup. We concentrated on how easy or difficult the unit was to clean, including the disassembly and reassembly of its filter system.

The classic Bodum Chambord makes a balanced cup of coffee, retaining most of the tasting notes of the coffee and little of the grit of the grounds. Designed in the 1950s, the Chambord looks like the quintessential French press, and its steel frame is more durable than the Bodum Brazil’s plastic body. The Chambord didn’t make the brightest coffee of the bunch, but the flavors of its brew held their own against those of presses three times its price.
This coffee maker was a very pleasant surprise for our testers in more ways than one. One reviewer, who’d never tried a French press before, didn’t expect this one to be so easy to use and produce such a “solid” cup of coffee consistently. In terms of negatives, our testers wished the plunger and filter were a bit more sturdy to ensure that you’re plunging directly downward every single time so no grounds escape into the coffee. One tester also wished he had requested a larger model. (We got him a 12-ounce press, but this coffee maker can be as big as 51 ounces.) His small French press couldn’t make multiple cups with each use, but he did note that its small size made cleanup especially seamless.

The press should also be sturdy enough to handle daily plunging and cleaning with ease. Presses with a glass beaker should have an exterior that will cushion and protect it from bumps and drops. But even the nicest glass beaker may crack after years of handling, so if you want a French press to grow old with you, a stainless steel model is a great choice. And any good press should have replacement parts, such as beakers and filters, available to purchase online.
The base-plate of the filter system is also of noticeably low quality, constructed of thin, slightly warped metal with channels pressed into it. The threading at the bottom of the rod is imprecise, causing an occasional challenge in getting it started back into the filter base. And the cylindrical nut at the bottom of the rod that keeps the three plates of the filter assembly sandwiched tightly together and attached to the rod is especially poorly designed and constructed. Higher-quality press pots have this nut either permanently installed at end of the rod or otherwise prevented from sliding upward on the rod, yet on the Mr. Coffee assembly, the nut winds freely up or down. A user must thread the rod into the filter base, and then thread the loose nut down just so, finding exactly the right combination of tightening to secure the filter, a fussy, annoying procedure. In the course of one busy morning cleanup, I had to abandon a partially assembled filter system in frustration in order to get on with my day.

Clever Creations


Capacity - A full-size French Press can typically produce a full cup of coffee. If you wish to make multiple cups at one brewing, choose a press with a more generous capacity and allows you to brew enough coffee for several drinkers. Since most French Press carafes don’t employ warming methods, it is important to consider the natural heat retention of the product you’re buying. A French Press with a large capacity won’t be of much value if it cannot keep the beverage hot for a reasonable amount of time.
Meanwhile, we had high hopes for Le Creuset, given the impressive quality of other products from that brand. We were especially curious how well its attractive stoneware carafe would perform. We were disappointed to discover, however, that the robust-looking stoneware does not retain heat well during brewing. Add to poor heat retention a wobbly lid and middling-quality filter, and we were left with a fine looking but technically limited brewing device.
Here’s what we do know. Coffee made without a paper filter does contain substances called cafestol and kahweol. These molecules can decrease LDL receptors, which are responsible for siphoning LDL cholesterol out of your body’s circulation. “This decreased number of LDL receptors would be expected to raise your cholesterol,” said Dr. Karol Watson, a cardiologist and co-director of the UCLA Program in Preventive Cardiology.
On the other hand, an argument could be made that, because the French press method is classic, and because glass is the classic material for the carafe, then a traditional cup prepared by this method ought to be brewed with a steeply declining temperature profile. Staunch traditionalists may therefore prefer the Chambord cup as it is, while contemporary perfectionists can always choose to spend more on a brewer with a better-insulated carafe to meet today’s more exacting standards for brewing consistency and control.

Caribou Coffee


Coffee brewed in a French Press has a distinct flavor and if you are a fan of stronger coffee, then getting a stainless steel variant makes complete sense. You then need to look into three factors – Brew Quality, Heat-Retention and Durability. Well, Frieling French Press ranks high in all of these metrics and here is why it is our top recommendation –

Ease of cleaning Making the coffee is only half of the process. When you’re done, you need to remove the plunger, dispose of the used coffee grounds, and clean the carafe for the next use. Dishwasher-safe components will be easier to clean, although some people prefer to wash their press by hand right after use so it’s ready to make more coffee whenever it’s needed.
By allowing coffee grounds to steep before pushing them through a steel filter, the French press releases natural oils that create a robust, clean taste that’s simply not possible with drip coffee makers. We spent over 30 hours of research and testing to determine that the SterlingPro –  Double Wall Stainless Steel French Press is the best French press coffee maker. It keeps coffee hotter for longer than any other French press we tested, and its sleek and durable construction contributes to a delicious cup every time. Our runner-up is the Bodum – Chambord.

Banned Coffee

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