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Capacity - A full-size French Press can typically produce a full cup of coffee. If you wish to make multiple cups at one brewing, choose a press with a more generous capacity and allows you to brew enough coffee for several drinkers. Since most French Press carafes don’t employ warming methods, it is important to consider the natural heat retention of the product you’re buying. A French Press with a large capacity won’t be of much value if it cannot keep the beverage hot for a reasonable amount of time.

Stainless Steel French Presses: A double-walled design is key for stainless steel French Presses. Two walls will help keep the heat in and make for a better brew. You should also check for the quality of the stainless steel — 18/8 and 18/10 ratios of chromium to nickel are best. Stainless steel carafes are more durable, but you miss out on the fun visual element of glass French Presses.


Unlike the other stainless steel presses we tested, the Espro P7 plunges smoothly to the bottom of the press without making any noise. Both the Secura and the Frieling had metal filters that made a harsh scraping noise as we moved them against their interior steel walls, whereas the Espro P7’s rubber-rimmed filter made for a lubricated, silent plunge.
However, in terms of functionality and taste results, there’s no substantial difference between an inexpensive press and a more expensive one–as long as you’re buying from a good manufacturer. The price difference is mainly for improved looks. On the whole, stainless steel french options are more expensive than glass models. Bear that in mind as you decide which type to buy!
As you may know, the plunger of a coffee press is attached to the lid, a lid that has to be tight fitting and well constructed. As long as the plunger is securely attached to the lid, it should depress smoothly without any stiffness or looseness. For this reason, both the plunger and the lid can be made from metal, plastic or a combination of plastic and stainless steel as some of the high-end models tend to do.
Set a timer for four minutes. One minute in, pull out the plunger, and using a spoon, gently break up the crust of grounds that has accumulated on the top of your coffee. Put the lid back on and wait until the remainder of the four minutes is up. Then plunge all the way down slowly to avoid agitating the grounds. Pour your coffee into mugs or a carafe right away to stop the brewing—coffee that remains in the press will continue extracting and turn bitter and sour. For more guidance, watch Carey’s French press how-to video, which we consulted before brewing batches for our tasting panel.
On the other hand, an argument could be made that, because the French press method is classic, and because glass is the classic material for the carafe, then a traditional cup prepared by this method ought to be brewed with a steeply declining temperature profile. Staunch traditionalists may therefore prefer the Chambord cup as it is, while contemporary perfectionists can always choose to spend more on a brewer with a better-insulated carafe to meet today’s more exacting standards for brewing consistency and control.
The SterlingPro Coffee and Espresso Maker uses a heat-resistant borosilicate glass in its carafe, making it less likely to crack due to thermal shock. The lid does contain some plastic, but this material does not make direct contact with the brew. The carafe features a stylish chrome framework. The transparent glass body results in a considerable trade-off in heat retention and durability.
If you’re willing to pay more for a press that preserves as much of your beans’ brightness and flavor as possible, we recommend the Espro Press P3. The clear front-runner among our tasting panel, this Espro model offers an unusual bucket-shaped double filter that’s much finer than most and will keep your coffee almost as grit-free as pour-over. But at around twice the price of the Chambord at this writing, the Espro P3 is a definite splurge, so we recommend it only for people who are very particular about grit in their coffee.

Ovente


Carafe Type: A French press carafe is made of borosilicate glass or steel. Borosilicate glass is a special type of glass that’s resistant to heat. However, they are prone to chipping and cracking if handled carelessly. Steel carafes are more durable than glass carafes are. But, with steel carafes, you can never tell how much coffee remains in the carafe.

As a result, the handle tends to slip out of the frame once it's been bent, and that's how catastrophe takes place. I've noticed this myself and had one or two close calls over the years, but I was able to bend it back into place which, touch wood, has held. Still, it's certainly an inconvenience. What's more inconvenient is a limited one year warranty that doesn't cover the glass.
This is one of our favorite newcomers to the French press market in 2018. Espro is by no means a new brand, but their P5 model is a complete revamp of their older P3 version. It has a much improved and airtight filtration system that does not get clogged even when using the richest and darkest grounds. The P5 has a very elegant, but yet sturdy, glass design and we think it will fit nicely in most modern kitchens.
Most French presses come in multiple sizes, but we recommend buying a 32-ounce press, especially if you want to make coffee for multiple people. If you choose to go smaller, pay attention to how many ounces, not “cups,” the press can hold. For example, the Bodum Chambord three-cup model handles just 12 ounces, because the company defines a cup of coffee as 4 ounces. For reference, a tall cup of coffee at Starbucks is 8 ounces.
Bodum’s Chambord is our ultimate recommendation for a french press. This is the company’s original design, and it’s what most people imagine when they hear the words “french press.” It looks fantastic, it’s very user-friendly, and it comes in lots of different sizes. There’s a perfect Chambord for any household size, whether you’re a solo coffee drinker or brewing for a family. All the options are made entirely in Portugal.
Last but not least, one must also pay attention to the overall design of a French press, mostly for aesthetic reasons. Usually, French presses tend to be built in a traditional fashion, even though some can also boast certain patterns or physical additions that may or may not affect the general performance of the press itself. Keep in mind that this may also affect the unit’s price, a price that can range anywhere from $20 to $150 or more depending on its capabilities.
The Espro Press entered the market about five years ago with the distinction of having been the focus of one of the earliest successful coffee-related Kickstarter campaigns. When the crowd-funding platform itself was less than three years old, the Espro project raised over 550 percent of its $15,000 goal, then actually shipped its promised product to backers only three months later. So, not only did the company pitch, design and manufacture a superlative product, but its fundraising efforts and follow-through were also exemplary.

VonShef


Unfortunately after several months use I have discovered it has a major design flaw that has really bummed me out on this purchase. Namely the handle. The handle is designed to not need screws or rivets as it pops together and is held together by tension of the metal cage that holds the glass chamber. Over time it seems something has warped and it keep swinging loose at the bottom which can be a bit scary as it ONLY does it when its full of boiling hot water!! Had this problem surfaced earlier I would have returned it and looked at a different model or brand. It is sad as it really fits my needs and works in all other ways exactly as I want it and it makes great coffee but this makes it feel like kind of a chintzy item. It's a real shame.

Mulvadi Corporation


Our reviewers spent 13 hours testing three of the most popular French press coffee makers on the market. To get the most complete results, our testers brewed a cup (or a few) every morning for weeks on end. We asked them to consider the most important features when using these coffee makers, from their performance to how easy they were to clean. We've outlined them here so that you, too, know what to look for when shopping.

We settled on 600 grams of water because that not only represented a weight/volume that all our test products could contain, but also because it represents just a bit more than one would need to brew two 10-ounce mugs of coffee, which is among the more common serving volumes needed in a household brewer. We wanted to test the same weight/volume in each device, given that different presses have varying maximum capacities and their rate of heat loss when filled to the maximum will differ.

French Presses


Indeed, this press pot is in a league of its own. The carafe of the Espro Press is faultless in build and performance and impressive in appearance. Fabricated entirely in polished steel, its commanding, elongated form is further emphasized by a long handle that gracefully curves almost from the top of the carafe to the bottom. The weight of the carafe in hand imparts a reassuring sense of sturdiness and potential longevity.

Our testers loved this French press coffee maker for its beautiful aesthetic and expert design. “The plunger seal is the finest I've experienced, which is a big deal when you make French press coffee and don't want grounds to leak around the plunger as you pour,” one of our reviewers raved. While our testers didn’t find many flaws with this product, one mentioned that the (attractive) stainless steel design means you can’t watch the grounds steep in the water. “The lack of that visual is a little unsettling,” she explained, particularly if you are new to a French press. In general, though, the takeaway was simple: “It's a beautiful piece that feels worth the price,” declared one of our reviewers.

SterlingPro


This is one of our favorite newcomers to the French press market in 2018. Espro is by no means a new brand, but their P5 model is a complete revamp of their older P3 version. It has a much improved and airtight filtration system that does not get clogged even when using the richest and darkest grounds. The P5 has a very elegant, but yet sturdy, glass design and we think it will fit nicely in most modern kitchens.

Kohana Coffee


And, given the critical importance of maintaining proper water temperature for brewing coffee, we conducted a series of tests on each brewer to measure heat-retention capabilities. These tests focused on measuring the rate at which hot water cooled over time inside the carafe, both with and without pre-heating, and at various volumes. We put particular weight on one test that we thought best exemplified a real-life situation, which involved pre-heating the pitcher by filling it to its maximum fill line with freshly boiled water and letting it stand for one minute, then dumping and refilling with 600 grams of water at a typical starting brewing temperature of 205 degrees Fahrenheit.

Primula


The press should also be sturdy enough to handle daily plunging and cleaning with ease. Presses with a glass beaker should have an exterior that will cushion and protect it from bumps and drops. But even the nicest glass beaker may crack after years of handling, so if you want a French press to grow old with you, a stainless steel model is a great choice. And any good press should have replacement parts, such as beakers and filters, available to purchase online.

To make coffee using a French press, you’ll only need three things: ground coffee beans, hot water and your French press coffeemaker. Pour your ground coffee into your French press and shake them gently to make sure they’ve settled on the bottom. Then, add hot water to fill the press, stir and let the grounds steep. (You’ll want to be sure that the water you pour is heated between 198 and 204 degrees Fahrenheit. The right temperature is essential to extract essential oils and to develop the fullest flavor from the coffee beans.) After steeping, slowly press the plunger all the way down to filter the grounds from the coffee. Enjoy!
However, in terms of functionality and taste results, there’s no substantial difference between an inexpensive press and a more expensive one–as long as you’re buying from a good manufacturer. The price difference is mainly for improved looks. On the whole, stainless steel french options are more expensive than glass models. Bear that in mind as you decide which type to buy!
This kind of experience can lead a user to avoid thoroughly cleaning the filter on a regular basis, which is particularly bad news given the mysterious grooves in the base plate. Furthermore, the glass is slightly hazy even at its cleanest, is not dishwasher safe, and there are so many warnings about its breakability (on the box, on the glass itself and in the instruction pamphlet) that one has to wonder just how many uses or cleanings it can withstand, even with the gentlest of handling.
However, in terms of functionality and taste results, there’s no substantial difference between an inexpensive press and a more expensive one–as long as you’re buying from a good manufacturer. The price difference is mainly for improved looks. On the whole, stainless steel french options are more expensive than glass models. Bear that in mind as you decide which type to buy!
Yet, all this tidiness comes at a rather high price. Shoppers could easily find another insulated steel press pot complete with a rubber filter gasket, then buy a decent (if not higher-precision) scale and a timer separately, and still come away with enough leftover cash for a couple of bags of fresh, locally roasted beans. Furthermore, users predisposed to this level of precision will probably already have a scale and timer on hand. But as an icebreaker for the clutter-averse newcomer to coffee geekery who’s more inclined to make the most of onboard features than to fiddle with multiple different devices in concert, the Precision Press is an excellent way to go.

BRU USA

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