However, this is a case where material matters, and French presses made of certain materials are better for different types of coffee drinkers, even if all of these coffee machines function in basically the same way. So to help you figure out which French press is best for you and your caffeine habit, we took a deep dive into the most common types of French presses available and broke down the pros and cons of each material, along with some archetypal examples that you can buy.
The main advantage of having a plastic French press is that it’s harder to break than a glass one, yet much cheaper than a stoneware or metal one (but more on those in a bit). It’s also a great French press for camping or anywhere you can’t bring glass. The flavor of the coffee really shouldn’t be affected if you’re using BPA-plastic versus glass, just be sure that the plunger itself is made of stainless steel.
The press’s carafe is made from heat-resistant borosilicate glass with an 18/8 stainless steel plunger and gaskets, and a commercial grade plastic filter screen. It has 16-ounce water markings, so there’s no need to measure the water before you add it. This has a unique screw-top design that’s different from the competition and holds the lid safe from accidental removal.
This is the same type of glass used to create bakeware that can withstand oven temperatures of 450 degrees or higher. Unlike regular glass, borosilicate consists at least 5% of a compound called boric oxide. When putting together with silica and boron trioxide, this glass becomes extremely resistant to thermal shock. In non-science and geeky words: your carafe will not explode into hundreds of tiny pieces when you pour hot water inside. It will, however, break should you drop it on a hard surface.

Bean Envy


Price - There is no considerable difference in the quality of the finished product produced by low-end and high-end models. However, price becomes a main consideration where durability, reliability, construction and ease of operation are concerned. In general, high-priced French Press coffee makers offer a more solid construction and better heat retention, while budget-priced models tend to focus on serving size variations and enhanced visibility during the coffee-brewing process.
Coffee grind and amount: For a French Press, you should choose a coarse grind to get the most flavor out of your beans. You can adjust the grind to suit your tastes, and a finer grind will result in a stronger brew. There's no exact measurement of how much coffee-to-water you should put in the French Press, but Serious Eats recommends "60-70 grams of coffee per liter of water."
This kind of experience can lead a user to avoid thoroughly cleaning the filter on a regular basis, which is particularly bad news given the mysterious grooves in the base plate. Furthermore, the glass is slightly hazy even at its cleanest, is not dishwasher safe, and there are so many warnings about its breakability (on the box, on the glass itself and in the instruction pamphlet) that one has to wonder just how many uses or cleanings it can withstand, even with the gentlest of handling.

OXO


However, this is a case where material matters, and French presses made of certain materials are better for different types of coffee drinkers, even if all of these coffee machines function in basically the same way. So to help you figure out which French press is best for you and your caffeine habit, we took a deep dive into the most common types of French presses available and broke down the pros and cons of each material, along with some archetypal examples that you can buy.
Metal French-press coffee makers are, in many ways, the most versatile. Like ceramic or stoneware coffee makers, metal French presses are also ideal for entertaining, handsome enough to put out as part of a fancy brunch spread. Though metal isn’t known for retaining heat, these are often well-insulated with double walls, meaning your fresh coffee will stay hot for a while. A lot of metal French presses are also dishwasher-safe, and the chances of breaking one are slim to none. The trade-off is that metal French presses are often quite expensive, so you’ll be paying if you want this kind of versatility.

Baratza

×