By allowing coffee grounds to steep before pushing them through a steel filter, the French press releases natural oils that create a robust, clean taste that’s simply not possible with drip coffee makers. We spent over 30 hours of research and testing to determine that the SterlingPro –  Double Wall Stainless Steel French Press is the best French press coffee maker. It keeps coffee hotter for longer than any other French press we tested, and its sleek and durable construction contributes to a delicious cup every time. Our runner-up is the Bodum – Chambord.
Remember when I said that if you're even a teensy bit klutzy you will eventually break the glass carafe? If you're particularly accident prone, consider buying a stainless steel French press instead. Stainless steel presses look sleek and feel a bit more company-worthy, transitioning easily from the kitchen to the dining table. Many, like the SterlingPro model, have the added bonus of being double-walled for insulation, so you don't have to worry about your coffee going tepid before the second cup. The drawback is that they also tend to be significantly pricier than their glass and plastic counterparts—but that's why we were intrigued to see how the SterlingPro, which is even cheaper than the Chambord, performed.
The Espro Press entered the market about five years ago with the distinction of having been the focus of one of the earliest successful coffee-related Kickstarter campaigns. When the crowd-funding platform itself was less than three years old, the Espro project raised over 550 percent of its $15,000 goal, then actually shipped its promised product to backers only three months later. So, not only did the company pitch, design and manufacture a superlative product, but its fundraising efforts and follow-through were also exemplary.
However, the glass carafe walls are thinner compared to the walls of carafes that come with more expensive models. Although the borosilicate wall tolerates heat stress well, it can chip or crack under mechanical stress. So, you should be careful when handling the carafe. You should also be careful when pouring coffee because the plastic lid loosely fits the mouth of the carafe.
But if you want to be a little more precise, here’s the ideal brewing method and amount of ingredients, according to Carey. First, consider your ratio of coffee to water. If you’re brewing a lighter roast, a ratio of 1-to-14 or 1-to-15 is ideal. In practical terms, this ratio would require 63 grams of grounds to make a full 32-ounce pot. With fuller-bodied darker roasts, you’ll get more flavor extraction, so a ratio of 1-to-16 or 1-to-17, or 58 grams for a 32-ounce pot, would suffice. French presses also require a much coarser grind than most brewing methods, so use the appropriate setting on your grinder or look for bags of preground coffee that advertise a less fine blend.

Browny Coffee


While the brewer is beautiful and hefty, the filter assembly on the inside of the press — a key component in the performance of the brewer — is of no greater quality than offered by substantially cheaper products. The metals are thin and the design is standard; the mesh of its filter is no finer than average and allows a typical amount of silt to pass through it and remain in the cup. Though it’s not remarkably worse than many of its competitors, it’s also not better, betraying the stature of the brand.


We selected the top nine products and, over a highly caffeinated five-day stretch, performed four in-depth tests on taste, usability, heat retention, and amount of coffee grounds remaining after a pour. We also compared their key metrics: cost, capacity, cleaning ease, material, accessories, and portability. Our finalists are all made of high-quality material, like borosilicate glass and stainless steel.
Okay, so there's not a lot to a French Press: stainless steel for the frame and plunger, a little polypropylene for the handle, and heat-resistant borosilicate for the carafe. If you want to jazz up your pot a little, consider the cork-topped plunger. Bodum, though a Danish company, makes its French Presses in Portugal, which is, after all, the cork capital of the world.
Unfortunately, polycarbonate is prone to scratches and dings over time. Cleaning can pose a challenge, and interior staining can occur. There is also the concern that a chemical called BPA could leach out of the plastic and into the food. We urge consumers to look for phrases like “BPA-Free” or “Contains No BPA” when considering a polycarbonate model.
Unlike the other stainless steel presses we tested, the Espro P7 plunges smoothly to the bottom of the press without making any noise. Both the Secura and the Frieling had metal filters that made a harsh scraping noise as we moved them against their interior steel walls, whereas the Espro P7’s rubber-rimmed filter made for a lubricated, silent plunge.
With this ingenious French press from Coffee Gator, you get a machine capable of not only brewing a few cups of delicious coffee but also keeping it at a drinkable temperature throughout the day. Made of military-grade stainless steel, this coffee maker features double walls that are thicker and heavier than almost any other French press out there. Unlike glass coffee makers, this press keeps coffee hot for at least one hour more.
This coffee maker was a very pleasant surprise for our testers in more ways than one. One reviewer, who’d never tried a French press before, didn’t expect this one to be so easy to use and produce such a “solid” cup of coffee consistently. In terms of negatives, our testers wished the plunger and filter were a bit more sturdy to ensure that you’re plunging directly downward every single time so no grounds escape into the coffee. One tester also wished he had requested a larger model. (We got him a 12-ounce press, but this coffee maker can be as big as 51 ounces.) His small French press couldn’t make multiple cups with each use, but he did note that its small size made cleanup especially seamless.

Hale Kai Lana


Buy the color that fits your kitchen. This copper one is lovely and a joy to see in the mornings. I wish it was more of a joy to use. The plunging mechanism tends to be wobbly, sometimes going down unevenly unless I steady the metallic base with my other hand. After four different types of coarsely ground beans, it rarely seems to plunge as smoothly as in the video.

The plunger and filter assemblies are made of stainless steel, but the actual grade of that steel may be variable. We do like the fact that the Primula's fragile carafe is protected by a plastic framework with a full-sized handle for easy pouring. Our conclusion is that the Primula Tempo is ideal for the casual coffee drinker who may only require one or two full cups at one sitting. The Primula Tempo's advertised capacity is six cups, but that is closer to three American-sized mugs.
When I lined the Chambord up with the rest of the contenders and put them all through the same tests, I was struck (and, I admit, pleasantly surprised) by how impressively it still held its own. The Chambord looks great right out of the box and its matte black polypropylene handle (which has a subtly retro look, like Bakelite) feels comfy and secure in the hand. The double-filtering combo of the fine mesh filter and perforated steel plate plunges smoothly and effortlessly into the carafe while still remaining tight enough to keep the coffee clean and grit-free. And that brew tastes really, really great: bright, clean, and balanced, but with enough body to remind you that you're drinking press coffee, not drip or pour-over. The press comes apart seamlessly after brewing and the pieces are easy to rinse and clean.

Unfortunately after several months use I have discovered it has a major design flaw that has really bummed me out on this purchase. Namely the handle. The handle is designed to not need screws or rivets as it pops together and is held together by tension of the metal cage that holds the glass chamber. Over time it seems something has warped and it keep swinging loose at the bottom which can be a bit scary as it ONLY does it when its full of boiling hot water!! Had this problem surfaced earlier I would have returned it and looked at a different model or brand. It is sad as it really fits my needs and works in all other ways exactly as I want it and it makes great coffee but this makes it feel like kind of a chintzy item. It's a real shame.
We also held a blind-tasting panel with four coffee fiends among Wirecutter’s staff to assess how bright or muddled the flavors were from each press, as well as how much grit lingered in the bottom of each cup. For the panel, we upgraded to a more luxurious bean—Café Grumpy’s Mahiga, a single-origin roast from Nyeri, Kenya––which we ground in one of our favorite burr grinders, the Baratza Virtuoso. For each batch, we used 25 grams of coffee to 350 milliliters of water, steeping for four minutes sharp. Each panelist took notes on how clarified, acidic, and muddy each brew tasted, as well as how much of the grounds remained in their cup. We concluded our test with a roundtable discussion of what we liked and didn’t like about each press.
By allowing coffee grounds to steep before pushing them through a steel filter, the French press releases natural oils that create a robust, clean taste that’s simply not possible with drip coffee makers. We spent over 30 hours of research and testing to determine that the SterlingPro –  Double Wall Stainless Steel French Press is the best French press coffee maker. It keeps coffee hotter for longer than any other French press we tested, and its sleek and durable construction contributes to a delicious cup every time. Our runner-up is the Bodum – Chambord.

Banned Coffee

×