Reviews of the Bodum Chambord on Amazon are largely positive (about 3,000, rounding out to 4.2/5 stars), but a good number of them complain about the same thing: The stainless steel frame that holds the carafe in place is wont to warp over time, especially if you're not careful when you remove the carafe. That would be more or less fine if the plastic handle weren't supported by it on one side with no fastener.
We were skeptical at first. The SterlingPro is a clone of the more expensive metal presses, like the high-end Frieling, and is only available on Amazon. Even though it has over 2,800 five-star reviews, could the quality of the French press and the coffee it produced really measure up to models that sold for three times the price? Short answer: yes!
Chambord is a true original – the classic French press Coffee maker designed in the fifties. And we still produce it with the same painstaking craftsmanship we used way back when with the original. The frame and lid, made of steel, undergo several Chrome Plating processes to obtain a durable shiny surface that will last for many years of intense use. The only difference in the production process since the fifties is our commitment to the highest standards of environmentally correct manufacturing, which is especially important during the Chrome Plating process. The black CHAMBORD polypropylene handle comes in a matte finish that not only gives a comfortable grip while serving but adds to the classic quality of the design. The French press system has always been the simplest and ultimate way of brewing an excellent cup of Coffee. Using fresh coarse ground beans with water between 92 and 96 degrees Celsius brings out the very best in all types of Coffee.
The Bottom Line: Quality comes at a price, and we would argue that a mild splurge on an Espro Press is well worth it. A niggling issue or two around cleaning the brewer keeps it from scoring even higher, though its heat-retention, its subtly elegant design and its nearly silt-free cup bring the Espro Press closer to perfection than any other press pot we tested.

Le Creuset


Because I got the 17 oz, I will say that the wideness of the press is unusual and I was a bit taken aback by how this particular wide design made the filter feel as it plunges. At first, I honestly thought there was a design flaw since the plunger didn't depress as easily as other presses I have had in the past. However, after using it to make coffee a few times now, it works flawlessly and I appreciate the extra resistance while plunging.
I have the larger version of this French Press and have used it for many years without issue. Using a French Press is one part science, one part cooking and three parts magic/luck. Once you figure out your settings you are in coffee nirvana land. Since I rarely have the need for 33 ounces of the nectar of the gods I decided to get the three person version.

Those issues aside, the all-in-one nature of the Precision Press remains a simple and effective means of introducing precision-brewing concepts to anyone who wants to up their hand-brewing game without an additional surge in countertop clutter. Furthermore, the handling of the electronics in regard to design is impressive: There is no visible suggestion of a scale either on the inside or outside of the carafe (it’s built into the base).


Clean up is a breeze. I add just a bit of water to the carafe after I remove it from the frame and pour into a strainer over the sink. Rinse with water and then dispose of the grounds in the garbage. Then wash by hand, remove and wash plunger ( screen, coil press, etc), dry all pieces except screen and put back together. Takes about 3 minutes or so. Ready for next use. And looks so pretty on the counter and while brewing. 

Kauai


What takes Le Creuset’s press down another quality notch is the lid design. Most French presses have a sort of sleeve extending from the bottom of the lid that nests snugly inside the top of the carafe, helping to hold the lid reliably in­ place, so that pouring the coffee can be a one-handed operation. Le Creuset has no such sleeve or nesting device. Its ceramic lid simply rests on top of the carafe with nothing to hold it steady apart from the rod that connects to the filter.

The electronics are a bit less impressive, though they do get the job done, and it’s a job no other French press can do on its own. The timer counts upwards in seconds and minutes, and the scale measures weight by the gram and includes a tare feature. Displaying weight down to the tenth of a gram would be better, and better still would be a timer capable of counting down and sounding an alarm when the optimum brew-time has been reached.

While Watson confirmed that the study’s results were valid, she said there was not enough information to make any broad recommendations. “It is impossible to know how drinking French press (or really any unfiltered coffee, including percolated) would affect an individual person's cholesterol,” she said. Watson added that other “epidemiological studies have identified a relationship between drinking 3-5 cups of coffee per day and improved survival, but these studies didn't differentiate between different manners of preparation.”


This step gives the French press its name and reputation. Attach the plunger/filter assembly to the top of the carafe with the plunger fully extended. Using steady pressure (approximately 15 to 20 pounds of force), push the filter slowly to the bottom of the carafe. The spent coffee grounds should remain trapped behind the mesh filter, and the finished beverage should be dark and hot.
As a result of its near-perfect, shatter-resistant, BPA-free glass carafe construction, this coffee maker stands out as one of the sturdiest out there. Versatile and easy to use, this reliable coffee press can extract the perfect amount of essential oils and acids from virtually any type of coffee you might enjoy. It also benefits from a 3-part stainless steel mesh filter and 100% dishwasher-safe components.
If not elegant, the Brazil’s simple design is inoffensive, belying the fact that its shell is plastic. Some testers even preferred the look of the no-frills Brazil to the fussier-looking Chambord. The Brazil’s triangular handle puts a welcome amount of space between your fingers and the hot glass of the beaker. And if you dislike the handle’s modern look, an older version of the Brazil comes in a more traditional design with a symmetrical handle, though this shape will bring your knuckles closer to the hot glass.

When we refer to the ‘durability’ of a French press, we mostly talk about its capacity to withstand long-term usage without showcasing signs of mechanical damage. For this reason alone, you should perhaps stay clear of glass carafes because they tend to break during the cleaning process. You also have to look for a press that doesn’t allow fine grinds to clog the filter, which may be a bit harder to do unless you educate yourself on the matter. To be on the safe side, you should look for a press with a stainless steel carafe, preferably one that is double-insulated.

Those issues aside, the all-in-one nature of the Precision Press remains a simple and effective means of introducing precision-brewing concepts to anyone who wants to up their hand-brewing game without an additional surge in countertop clutter. Furthermore, the handling of the electronics in regard to design is impressive: There is no visible suggestion of a scale either on the inside or outside of the carafe (it’s built into the base).
When you picture a French press, you’re probably picturing something with metal scaffolding and a glass carafe. That’s the standard style of French press, and as such, is often the least expensive and most readily available. This is why a glass French press is a solid choice for beginners, or anyone who doesn’t want to spend too much money on a coffee maker.
It may not have the set-it-and-forget-it convenience of a drip coffee maker or the cachet of a pour-over kit, but if you're looking for a quick and uncomplicated way to make a great cup of coffee, the French press (also known as a press pot) is hard to beat. The best French presses have a simple design, but the marketplace is littered with all sorts of subtle variations on the form, each one claiming innovation and vying for supremacy: glass versions, plastic versions, stainless steel versions; press pots that are insulated or double-filtered or oversized.
A French Press is a classic coffee maker, and many manufacturers stick with a traditional design. Others add design flair that may or may not work in your kitchen. So think about whether you want to look at a particular model day in and day out. While most can be stowed away easily, you'll likely want to keep it handy once you've mastered the technique.
This coffee maker was a very pleasant surprise for our testers in more ways than one. One reviewer, who’d never tried a French press before, didn’t expect this one to be so easy to use and produce such a “solid” cup of coffee consistently. In terms of negatives, our testers wished the plunger and filter were a bit more sturdy to ensure that you’re plunging directly downward every single time so no grounds escape into the coffee. One tester also wished he had requested a larger model. (We got him a 12-ounce press, but this coffee maker can be as big as 51 ounces.) His small French press couldn’t make multiple cups with each use, but he did note that its small size made cleanup especially seamless.
CONSThe mesh filter is not always effective at removing sediment from the coffee.The handle is not very well designed, which makes pouring a little awkward.Sediment is left floating near the bottom because the filter does not press all the way to the bottom. CLICK TO CHECK PRICE 3. The KONA French PressLike the Colorful Brew, the KONA’s frame is made from BPA-free plastic. It features a stainless steel filter which does a better job at straining out the coffee grit than some of the more expensive presses, like the Bodum Chambord. Additionally, this bad boy is able to be completely disassembled and machine washed. The KONA French press comes in two sizes, a travel-friendly 12oz and a bigger 34oz version.However, what sets this French press coffee maker apart from the Colorful Brew is its unique design.The KONA is not only fun to look at, but also safer to use. The large handle is ergonomically designed so that the handle fits comfortably and more securely in your hand as you pour. Ergonomic handle design is often overlooked in a press pot, and shouldn't be glossed over ...we've burned our hands multiple times while pouring, so we know what we're talking about here!Apart from that, the KONA is the least expensive item on this list, and it still functions just as well as all the others, although it may not last quite as long.PROSLeast expensive coffee press on this list.A finer filter screen is better at straining out the sediment than the Bodum Chambord.Ergonomic design is easy and comfortable to handle.Plunger and mesh filter are both made out of stainless steel.Available in red or black.CONSCertain pieces, like the filter and filter attachments, have a comparatively short lifespan.The thin plastic lid on the KONA may begin to stretch and crack over time. CLICK TO CHECK PRICE 4. The Frieling Stainless Steel French PressThe Frieling Stainless Steel French Press is one of the most stylish (and most expensive) press pots we've selected.Just like the Francois et Mimi, the Frieling is 100% stainless steel, but, unlike the Mimi, the Frieling holds 36 oz. instead of only 12 oz.It also features a double-walled interior, which makes it very effective at retaining heat.In addition to that, the Frieling’s two-stage filter fits more snugly into the chamber. With two extra-fine Italian mesh screens, it's excellent at keeping out sediment.All components of this French press coffee maker are machine washable, and the filter components don't even need to be disassembled for cleaning.PROSThe minimalistic design is both utilitarian and eye-catching.The two-stage metal filter is better at screening out sediment than other models.The stainless steel is more durable than glass.CONSThe most expensive on this list.It is not easy to clean. CLICK TO CHECK PRICE 5. The Bodum Brazil French PressThe Bodum Brazil is rated as Amazon's #1 best seller, and the attractive price isn't the only reason. The carafe is borosilicate glass, but it's carried in a handle, base, and lid of BPA-free plastic, which serves as a combination shock absorber and design element. In addition to basic black, the plastic components are available in a brilliant apple-green and a cheerful red. Bodum's standard three-part filtration system is present here, with a stainless steel mesh held in place by a spiral plate on top and a cross plate below. These disassemble easily for cleaning and are dishwasher-safe, as is the borosilicate carafe.PROSSimple design plus eye-catching colors make this a standout on your kitchen counter.The metal filter comes apart for easy cleaning.Low price CONSPlastic isn't everybody's idea of elegance.Glass is inferior to stainless steel in heat retention (and more fragile). CLICK TO CHECK PRICE 6. The Kuissential 8-Cup Stainless Steel French PressThe Kuissential looks an awful lot like the Sterling Pro French Press a few reviews below. It's made of stainless steel, it has double-wall construction for good insulation, and it has a similarly clean, cylindrical shape.The difference? The Kuissential has a single screen in the filter. Yes, just like every other French press we talk about (except the Sterling Pro).It's also noticeably less expensive than the Sterling. So if you like the look (and the double walls) and don't mind a little texture in your coffee, here's a way to get the look for a lower price. PROSCrisp, clean lines look great in any kitchen decor.Double-wall construction provides the best heat retention.Reasonably priced.CONSThe single screen allows a little grit to pass through. CLICK TO CHECK PRICE 7. The Bodum Columbia French PressDistinct from the two Bodum coffee makers we've already reviewed, the Columbia has a charming rounded shape. The ergonomic handle reminds us of the handles on gooseneck kettles for pour over, which gives you more control when pouring the last of the coffee (important if you want to keep the worst of the sediment in the pot).Available in 17 oz., 34 oz., and 51 oz. sizes, the Columbia uses double-wall insulation to keep your coffee hot for a claimed two hours. PROSDesign echoes the classic teapot shape but with a modern twist.All components are dishwasher safe.Thermal insulation helps keep coffee hot.CONSMore expensive than many on this list.Some plastic components in construction. CLICK TO CHECK PRICE 8. The Sterling Pro French PressThe stainless steel Sterling Pro will have you seeing double. First, its simple, clean design - a number of cylinders of different sizes assembled into a pitcher, a handle, and a knob for the plunger - has a huge number of imitators. Second, one of its key features, the SterlingPro Double Wall Construction, uses a double wall of stainless steel to provide maximum heat retention.But the last double is a fairly exclusive feature: its double screen filter. On the face of it, this simple, second mesh screen traps more sediment than a single. It's still not going to give you a completely grit-free cup like a pour over or drip coffee machine will, but the coffee is less chewy than what you get from the usual French press, yet still retains all the oils and solids that make French press coffee so flavorful.PROSDouble-wall construction provides the longest heat retention.The double screen filter makes a cleaner cup of coffee.Stainless steel is more durable than glass.CONSTwo filter screens mean more cleanup. CLICK TO CHECK PRICE 9. The Coffee Gator French PressLike the idea of double-wall stainless construction but don't want a silver cylinder like everyone else? The Coffee Gator has the construction you need with the range of visual appeal you want. Choose from gray, green, pink, or brushed stainless to bring a pop of color to your morning cuppa. It's only available in 34 oz. capacity, but that's a good all-around size, especially if you share your morning coffee - for example, it's just shy of three 12-oz. cups or two 18-oz. travel mugs.And like the Sterling Pro, the Gator has a double filter to remove more sediment, without removing the oils that make the French press provide such delicious coffee.It even comes with an airtight mini container that holds enough coffee for two pots, if you plan on traveling. PROSStainless steel construction plus eye-catching color make this unique.Double screen filter produces a cleaner cup.Double wall construction provides superior heat retention.CONSCanister not recommended for dishwasher. Double screen filter requires a little more effort to clean. CLICK TO CHECK PRICE THE VERDICTFor today’s review roundup, I have chosen the Frieling Stainless Steel French Press as the winner.Although it was a close race, the Frieling offered the highest quality (though admittedly at a price to match).The mirror-finished stainless steel construction makes the Frieling a thing of beauty, and the double-wall carafe keeps your coffee hot four times as long as a glass carafe. Dishwasher safe, 5-year warranty, and a two-stage filter round out the winning characteristics.If the price is a little steep, consider our runner-up: the Kona French Press. Good ergonomics and an effective and dishwasher-safe filter make this attractive pot a popular seller.Now that you know all about the best french press coffee makers on the market, it's time for you to learn how to expertly brew French Press coffee.If you still aren't sure whether you'd like French Press coffee - maybe you'd like a brewer with a bit less grit? We've compared all the different brewing methods for you here.TweetPin100Share+1100 Shares Updated March 29, 2019 Categories ↓ Coffee Makers Gear Related Posts AeroPress vs French Press [The Difference is Clear] The 5 Best Milk Frothers For Coffee of 2019 Best Coffee Maker With Grinder 2019 (Grind and Brew) 2019 Breville Espresso Machine Reviews: The Top 7 The 5 Best Coffee Thermos’s of 2019 The 7 Best Coffee Storage Containers of 2019 ←Previous post Next post→ Popular Posts The Last Coffee Grind Size Chart You’ll Ever Need How to Make Coffee Without a Coffee Maker [5 Hacks] How To Make Cold Brew Coffee In A Mason Jar 5 Best Siphon Coffee Makers (AKA Vacuum Coffee Brewers) 16 Bulletproof Coffee Recipes [Gets Your Mind + Body FIRING] What Type of Coffee Has the Most Caffeine? About HomeGroundsWe are obsessed with great coffee - and since you've ended up here, we can only assume that you are too!
This coffee maker was a very pleasant surprise for our testers in more ways than one. One reviewer, who’d never tried a French press before, didn’t expect this one to be so easy to use and produce such a “solid” cup of coffee consistently. In terms of negatives, our testers wished the plunger and filter were a bit more sturdy to ensure that you’re plunging directly downward every single time so no grounds escape into the coffee. One tester also wished he had requested a larger model. (We got him a 12-ounce press, but this coffee maker can be as big as 51 ounces.) His small French press couldn’t make multiple cups with each use, but he did note that its small size made cleanup especially seamless.

Hale Kai Lana


The Freiling Insulated Double-Wall Stainless Steel French Press is another favorite among critics and has hundreds of glowing Amazon reviews praising its luxe, insulated stainless body and the nuanced, light coffee it produced. We were impressed by the tightness of the seal around the filter—nary a particle of grit found its way into our cup—but that same tightness also made it a little awkward to use as we wrestled to get the plunger smoothly into the carafe. We also wondered if the Freiling's filter might be a little too effective: of all the models we tried, it produced coffee so clean that it tasted like pour-over. Which begs the question: if you're choosing a French press over a filter brewer, don't you want your coffee to have a little bit of body? The Frieling also costs about $100. During our tests, its inexpensive clone, the SterlingPro, performed nearly as well at brewing (and better at heat retention) at about a quarter of the price.
Deciding whether or not this French press truly earns its place in a kitchen equipped with the company’s skillets or Dutch ovens depends, to some extent, on what one’s goals are in owning such a piece. If beauty is the most important thing, either independently or to reinforce a look, then there may be no substitute for a genuine Le Creuset French press. Yet if a dedicated home chef invests in quality Le Creuset cookware less for the look and more for the pleasure of using well-made tools, then this French press may not live up to expectation.
This kind of experience can lead a user to avoid thoroughly cleaning the filter on a regular basis, which is particularly bad news given the mysterious grooves in the base plate. Furthermore, the glass is slightly hazy even at its cleanest, is not dishwasher safe, and there are so many warnings about its breakability (on the box, on the glass itself and in the instruction pamphlet) that one has to wonder just how many uses or cleanings it can withstand, even with the gentlest of handling.
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This traditional French press from Le Creuset is built in the style of old-school presses and even behaves as such to some extent. We say this because it features a stainless steel plunger and a mesh press among a few other interesting features. Among them, a non-porous enamel finish makes the press stand out, one that enables it to resist odors, staining, chipping, and cracking. It also owes its impressive durability to a glossy enamel glazing that is sure to resist extremely hot temperatures with no issues whatsoever.
When we refer to the ‘durability’ of a French press, we mostly talk about its capacity to withstand long-term usage without showcasing signs of mechanical damage. For this reason alone, you should perhaps stay clear of glass carafes because they tend to break during the cleaning process. You also have to look for a press that doesn’t allow fine grinds to clog the filter, which may be a bit harder to do unless you educate yourself on the matter. To be on the safe side, you should look for a press with a stainless steel carafe, preferably one that is double-insulated.

THE ORGANIC COFFEE CO.


It may not have the set-it-and-forget-it convenience of a drip coffee maker or the cachet of a pour-over kit, but if you're looking for a quick and uncomplicated way to make a great cup of coffee, the French press (also known as a press pot) is hard to beat. The best French presses have a simple design, but the marketplace is littered with all sorts of subtle variations on the form, each one claiming innovation and vying for supremacy: glass versions, plastic versions, stainless steel versions; press pots that are insulated or double-filtered or oversized.
Coffee brewed in a French Press has a distinct flavor and if you are a fan of stronger coffee, then getting a stainless steel variant makes complete sense. You then need to look into three factors – Brew Quality, Heat-Retention and Durability. Well, Frieling French Press ranks high in all of these metrics and here is why it is our top recommendation –
Most French presses come in multiple sizes, but we recommend buying a 32-ounce press, especially if you want to make coffee for multiple people. If you choose to go smaller, pay attention to how many ounces, not “cups,” the press can hold. For example, the Bodum Chambord three-cup model handles just 12 ounces, because the company defines a cup of coffee as 4 ounces. For reference, a tall cup of coffee at Starbucks is 8 ounces.
This kind of experience can lead a user to avoid thoroughly cleaning the filter on a regular basis, which is particularly bad news given the mysterious grooves in the base plate. Furthermore, the glass is slightly hazy even at its cleanest, is not dishwasher safe, and there are so many warnings about its breakability (on the box, on the glass itself and in the instruction pamphlet) that one has to wonder just how many uses or cleanings it can withstand, even with the gentlest of handling.
A French Press is a classic coffee maker, and many manufacturers stick with a traditional design. Others add design flair that may or may not work in your kitchen. So think about whether you want to look at a particular model day in and day out. While most can be stowed away easily, you'll likely want to keep it handy once you've mastered the technique.
If not elegant, the Brazil’s simple design is inoffensive, belying the fact that its shell is plastic. Some testers even preferred the look of the no-frills Brazil to the fussier-looking Chambord. The Brazil’s triangular handle puts a welcome amount of space between your fingers and the hot glass of the beaker. And if you dislike the handle’s modern look, an older version of the Brazil comes in a more traditional design with a symmetrical handle, though this shape will bring your knuckles closer to the hot glass.
A thoroughly high-quality cup is further ensured by the very effective double filter-gaskets on the outer edge of the filters that segregate not only the grinds but also an ounce or two of brewed coffee at the bottom of the carafe. If you really love your coffee, you may feel you want it all, but this little pool of withheld brew is the byproduct of an intentional design focused on producing a consistently bitterness-free cup, unmixed with any coffee that has tended to over-extract by remaining in contact with coffee grounds at the bottom of the carafe after the plunge.
Its mesh filter is not the finest on the market, and its coiled metal gasket is an outdated design compared to the tighter-fitting silicon or rubber gaskets in more costly press pots. Nevertheless, the silt the Chambord filter lets pass into the cup is no more pervasive than average, and can be mitigated, to some extent, with careful technique and a quality grinder.
If you always run out of time in the morning, you can make your coffee on the go with the Bodum Stainless-Steel Travel French Press Mug. Just spoon some coarsely ground coffee in the bottom, pour hot water on top, pop the lid on, and rush out the door. Plunge it down a few minutes later when you're in your car, on the subway, or at work, and voila! Fresh French Press coffee is yours.

Cresimo

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